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So you are a 401(k) plan ‘millionairess.’ Now what?

So you are a 401(k) plan ‘millionairess.’ Now what?

Finance
I recently read an article in The New York Times that detailed how, over the past 12 years, the number of women who have achieved "millionairess" status has doubled.Also, based on a recent Fidelity report that surveyed 15 million 401(k) plan participants, 20 percent of respondents with $ 1 million or more in retirement accounts are women. They invested wisely in stocks, saved more than 18 percent of their salaries and developed a consistent habit of contributing to their 401(k) plans. Many earn less than $ 150,000 annually, which makes the ability to reach this benchmark even more impressive.Achieving this goal doesn't change who you are, but it can change how you plan for your future. You worked hard and saved more, and now you have options. I've consulted with clients who have achieved t...
SoulCycle and Milk Bar Just Launched a ‘Power Cookie’—Here’s What a Nutritionist Thinks

SoulCycle and Milk Bar Just Launched a ‘Power Cookie’—Here’s What a Nutritionist Thinks

Health
SoulFuel is made with almonds, oats, coconut, macadamia, and pineapple—yum. There is just something about SoulCycle. The indoor cycling chain has a way of cultivating die-hard fans. And now they’ve got a new reason for folks to flock to their studios. Today Soul Cycle announced SoulFuel, a cookie designed to help "power your ride." Developed in collaboration with Christina Tosi, owner and chef at the award-winning bakery Milk Bar, SoulFuel is available at 20 studios across New York, Los Angeles, and the DC Metro area, as well as at milkbarstore.com ($ 5).“We're always thinking of new ways to surprise and delight our riders, and as there's a significant focus on wellness and nutrition in addition to fitness today, we're thrilled to te
British submarine HMS Audacious completes first dive

British submarine HMS Audacious completes first dive

Business
Jan. 17 (UPI) -- The HMS Audacious, Britain's latest nuclear-powered submarine, has successfully completed its first dive, reports shipbuilder BAE Systems.The Royal Navy's fourth Astute-class attack submarine was completely submerged for the first time at the company's Barrow, England, facility, and many of the 318-feet long vessel's onboard systems were successfully tested.The submarine is capable of carrying Tomahawk missiles and striking targets up to 600 miles away.The Audacious was launched in 2017, and will undergo sea trials later this year.At the time of its launch, BAE Systems Submarines managing director Will Blamey said the ship "enters the water in a more advanced state of build than any previous Astute-class submarine, which puts us in a good position for the next phase of wor...
What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

Technology
The meteor that lit up the night sky over southeast Michigan and shook the ground Tuesday night did not actually cause an earthquake, researchers say. In fact, meteors do not cause earthquakes to rupture along a fault, according to William Yeck, a research geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado. The seismic observations associated with the meteor were assigned a magnitude 2.0 by the United States Geological Survey, which said the event was centered about 5 miles west-southwest of New Haven, Michigan, some 40 miles northeast of Detroit. The National Weather Service sent out a tweet that said, "USGS confirms meteor occurred around 810 pm, causing a magnitude 2.0 earthquake." But Yeck said the magnitude cannot be di...
Mystery deepens over mass die-off of antelopes

Mystery deepens over mass die-off of antelopes

Science
A mass die-off of wild antelopes in Kazakhstan was triggered by environmental factors, scientists believe.More than 200,000 saiga antelopes collapsed and died suddenly in 2015, wiping out most of the global population.The deaths were found to be caused by a bacterial infection.However, new data shows other factors were involved too, including unusually high humidity and temperatures.Researchers think changing environmental conditions could be a trigger for the bacterial onslaught, although this needs further research.They say there is a high chance of the same thing happening again, given climate change predictions for the region.Study leader Prof Richard Kock of the Royal Veterinary College London was part of the original emergency response team.He said the event went way beyond what woul...