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North Korea’s nuclear program could be costing less than one US aircraft carrier

North Korea’s nuclear program could be costing less than one US aircraft carrier

Finance
When North Korea decided to go nuclear, it committed to a huge investment in a program that would bring severe sanctions and eat up precious resources that could have been spent boosting the nation's quality of life.Money well spent?Leader Kim Jong Un seems to think so.North Korea's nuclear and missile development programs have without doubt come at a high cost, but the North has managed to march ever closer to having an arsenal capable of attacking targets in the region and — as demonstrated by its July 4 test launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile — the United States' mainland.Good, solid figures for just about anything in North Korea are hard to find. So what follows should be taken as ballpark guesses, at best.But here's a look at how much that arsenal might cost Pyongyang, an
Bill Miller, Josh Brown are the latest Wall Street pros to test the bitcoin waters

Bill Miller, Josh Brown are the latest Wall Street pros to test the bitcoin waters

Finance
Some well-known names in the financial industry are buying bitcoin, and more could come.First, investing legend Bill Miller put 1 percent of his net worth into bitcoin in 2014, according to a Forbes report Tuesday. The digital currency is one of the top holdings in Miller's $ 120 million hedge fund, the article said.Reflecting its volatility, bitcoin in 2014 fell from a high of $ 1,023 in Jan. 2014 to a low near $ 287 in October of that year, according to CoinDesk.That puts Miller's bitcoin return anywhere from 126 percent to 707 percent, based on bitcoin's $ 2,315 price Wednesday.Miller left Legg Mason in August 2016 after 35 years and has since founded Miller Value Partners. The legendary investor's Opportunity Trust Fund Class C shares are up 23 percent this year, more than twice the re...
Here are 7 key steps to make sure you don’t outlive your money

Here are 7 key steps to make sure you don’t outlive your money

Finance
Making your money last throughout your lifetime used to be easy: Retire at 65, buy bonds, and live off your pension and Social Security. No sweat. You weren't expecting to live much past 70 or so, anyway.Things have changed. Interest rates are at historic lows, pensions are rare, and longevity is on the rise. Sure, you can still retire, but your bonds may only earn 2 percent and you're likely to live well into your 80s, if not 90s. And pensions? Forget it; the vast majority of us are on our own in today's 401(k) plan world.Given these conditions, I believe making your money last will be the single greatest financial challenge most people will face in this generation.In my view, making your money last can largely be boiled down to five key levers. Three are always unknown: investment return...
The Bitcoin Block Clock Jr. Is Half Full Node, Half Work of Art

The Bitcoin Block Clock Jr. Is Half Full Node, Half Work of Art

Finance
Shutterstock photoBitcoin is a decentralized system of digital cash in which users don't need to trust anyone else with their money; however, the full benefits of this technology are only seen when users operate a full node on the network. The vast majority of Bitcoin users do not operate their own full nodes, but one man is trying to change that with a piece of hardware he calls the Bitcoin Block Clock Jr.There are many good reasons for individual Bitcoiners to operate a full node. Full nodes are responsible for validating transactions and blocks on the Bitcoin network. Only by running full nodes can users know with full certainty that they received a valid payment. Additionally, the more users that run full nodes, the more decentralized the Bitcoin network is, making it harder to shut do...
Europe says employers must warn job applicants before checking them out on Facebook

Europe says employers must warn job applicants before checking them out on Facebook

Finance
Facebook reaches 2 billion monthly usersEurope has a message for employers: Think twice before you check the social media profiles of job applicants. European officials have issued new guidelines that warn bosses about the legal hazards of scrolling through the social media profiles of potential hires. The rules require employers to issue a disclaimer before they check applicants' online accounts, including Facebook(FB, Tech30), Instagram, Snapchat(SNAP), Twitter(TWTR, Tech30) and LinkedIn. If applicants don't see the warning, the company could be in breach of European Union data protection rules. Employers are also barred from compiling social media data as part of the hiring process unless it is "necessary and relevant" for a particular job. The guidelines are part of a lengthy docum...