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Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Here's what you need to know if you have inflation jitters

Finance
Seemingly everyone is on edge about the Federal Reserve's next moves — with reason.Throughout the nearly nine-year bull market run, the Fed held rates near zero. But recent signs of rising inflation could push the central bank into hiking rates more aggressively, which will have far-reaching consequences for consumers."Inflation is accelerating and may well push interest rates higher, allowing the Fed to move policy rates three times this year, and perhaps even four," Rick Rieder, chief investment officer of global fixed income at BlackRock, said in a statement.For the average American, the threat of rising interest rates isn't necessarily bad. It's generally considered a sign that the economy is doing well, which is what helped jump-start a wave of bonuses and may lead to more pay increas
3 serious problems with the 4% retirement rule

3 serious problems with the 4% retirement rule

Finance
We're all told to save as much money as possible for retirement, but how much is really enough? For years, experts have relied on the 4% rule to help determine how much savings is truly adequate. The rule states that if you begin by withdrawing 4% of your nest egg's value during your first year of retirement, and then adjust subsequent withdrawals for inflation, you'll avoid running out of money for 30 years. Not only is the 4% rule a nice idea in theory, but it's been tested and proven successful time and time again. That said, the 4% rule is far from perfect, so you'll need to be cautious about adopting it. Here are three specific problems to watch out for. 1. It makes assumptions about your investment mix The 4% rule is designed for portfolios with a relatively equal mix of stocks and...
Justice, FBI Russia-Trump Investigation Just Got Even More Corrupt — Why Does It Continue?

Justice, FBI Russia-Trump Investigation Just Got Even More Corrupt — Why Does It Continue?

Finance
Shutterstock photoRussia Scandal: Former high-level Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, a key cog in the Russia-Trump investigation, didn't let his employer know that his wife was being paid by Fusion GPS, the company that Hillary Clinton and the Democratic National Committee paid to dig up dirt on Trump. Nor did he seek a waiver for a possible conflict of interest. What is wrong with this investigation?[ibd-display-video id=2665422 width=50 float=left autostart=true]It's yet another indication of rot at the very core of this corrupt investigation whose only real aim has ever been to unseat Trump as president.As the Daily Caller reports , "The (DNC) ...hired Fusion GPS to gather and disseminate damning info about Trump, and they in turn paid Nellie Ohr, a former CIA employee with expert...
WisdomTree shares pop on report of JP Morgan interest in buying an ETF firm

WisdomTree shares pop on report of JP Morgan interest in buying an ETF firm

Finance
Shares of WisdomTree Investments jumped more than 6 percent Friday after reports that JP Morgan Chase is shopping for an exchange-traded fund firm.The U.S. bank's asset-management unit is looking to up its presence in the growing $ 3 trillion-plus ETF market, Bloomberg reported, citing two people who asked not to be identified. The bank spoke with the U.S. businesses of ETF Securities, and had talks with Global X, which was recently bought by South Korea's Mirae Asset Management, according to the report.WisdomTree stock closed at $ 10.41 Friday following the report, and is up more than 18 percent year over year.J.P. Morgan, which launched its first ETF product in 2014, would be entering the market after strong inflows last summer. More than $ 23 billion of investor money entered the market...
Never, ever purchase these things on your credit card

Never, ever purchase these things on your credit card

Finance
As we move farther and farther down the road toward a cashless society, consumers can use credit cards to pay for nearly everything, everywhere these days. But just because you can doesn't mean you necessarily should, warns credit reporting agency Experian.Outstanding card debt has now hit its highest point ever, surpassing $ 1 trillion in 2017, according to the Federal Reserve. And 86 percent of Americans who have or had credit card debt said they regret it, according to a recent report by NerdWallet.More from Advisor Insight:The bad things people do with 401(k) plansWhat sort of insurance do you need?Most consumers confused about credit, debtHere are six expenses Experian advises you to not put on plastic.1. Taxes. If you get slammed with an unexpected tax bill this April, it could be te...