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Physician burnout, depression can lead to major medical errors: Study

Physician burnout, depression can lead to major medical errors: Study

Health
Does your doctor’s mental health and well-being affect the care you receive? A new study says yes -- burnout, fatigue and depression may affect major medical errors. Medical errors contribute to an estimated 100,000 to 200,000 deaths per year, according to the Institute of Medicine. Burnout -- defined as emotional exhaustion or depersonalization -- occurs in more than half of doctors, according to the study. Researchers surveyed physicians across the country to understand the relationship between burnout and major medical errors in their careers. Their findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, suggest burnout, by itself, plays a large role in errors. Other independent factors affecting errors include the perceived safety of the workplace, physician fatigue and physician men...
Heatwave causes spike in insect bite calls to NHS

Heatwave causes spike in insect bite calls to NHS

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device Although many of us are enjoying the balmy temperatures of this year's heatwave, unfortunately for some, biting insects are flourishing too. Calls to the NHS helpline 111 about insect bites are almost double the rate they normally are at this time of year.And senior doctors are reporting incidents of patients being treated in hospital for infected horsefly bites. Despite the heat, experts say standing water, such as garden paddling pools, where insects thrive should be removed.Dr Nick Scriven, president of the Society for Acute Medicine, said: "We wouldn't normally see anyone coming to hospital for a bite, but we have seen a few recently needing treatment with antibiotics which is very unusual. "A c...
Study: Healthy obese people don't face increased death risk

Study: Healthy obese people don't face increased death risk

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- People who are obese but otherwise healthy do not have an increased rate of mortality, according to a study in Toronto -- conflicting with results of a major study in Europe. Researchers at York University's Faculty of Health followed 54,089 men and women from five cohort studies through 2017. Participants who were otherwise healthy were compared with those with elevated glucose, blood pressure or lipids alone or another metabolic factor, including smoking status, ethnicity, age and lifestyle. Their findings were published Thursday in the journal Clinical Obesity. "This is in contrast with most of the literature and we think this is because most studies have defined metabolic healthy obesity as having up to one metabolic risk factor," said study leader Dr. Jennifer Kuk, ...
Wearable devices could predict risk for senior falls

Wearable devices could predict risk for senior falls

Health
July 12 (UPI) -- Wearable devices with motion sensors can predict older participants' risk of falling, according to a study. Researchers at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign found that measuring unsteadiness in standing and walking can predict the most common injury among adults 65 and older. Their findings were published Wednesday in npj Digital Medicine. Three million older people are treated in emergency departments for fall injuries each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That includes at least 300,000 older people hospitalized for hip fractures, of which 95 percent are caused by falling. Older and young people fall for different reasons. Younger people misjudge something, such as a slippery surface, and older adults are unstable, and lose...