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Hancock: Follow Covid rules or they will get tougher

Hancock: Follow Covid rules or they will get tougher

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your device Covid restrictions in England will get tougher if rules are not followed, Matt Hancock has warned, as the government introduces £10,000 fines for people who fail to self-isolate.The health secretary told the BBC's Andrew Marr show the country was facing a "tipping point and we have a choice"."If everybody follows the rules then we can avoid further national lockdown."The prime minister is understood to be considering a ban on households mixing, and reducing opening hours for pubs.Asked if England could face another national lockdown, Mr Hancock said: "I don't rule it out, I don't want to see it."In the BBC interview, he also said: He would call the police on people who refused to self-isolate He den
Covid: PM considering new restrictions amid second coronavirus wave

Covid: PM considering new restrictions amid second coronavirus wave

Health
Boris Johnson is spending the weekend considering whether to tighten Covid-19 measures in England, after saying the UK was "now seeing a second wave". The government is understood to be looking at a ban on households mixing, and reducing opening hours for pubs. At least 13.5 million people, roughly one in five of the UK population, are already facing local restrictions.It came as the PM announced new fines for those avoiding self-isolation.Former government adviser Prof Neil Ferguson said new measures were needed "sooner rather than later". The scientist, whose advice was crucial to the decision to go into lockdown in March, said: "If we leave it another two to four weeks, we will be back at [infection] levels we were seeing mor...
Expanding donor list shortens heart transplant wait times, study finds

Expanding donor list shortens heart transplant wait times, study finds

Health
Sept. 18 (UPI) -- Accepting hearts from older donors and those with some chronic health conditions allowed surgeons at Yale New Haven Hospital to perform more transplants and reduce the time recipients spent on the waiting list, without negatively impacting safety and health, an analysis published Friday by JAMA Network Open found. With the changes, the hospital was able to more than quadruple the number of heart transplants it performed and cut the average time recipients were on the waiting list by nearly 200 days, the researchers said. Advertisement The findings suggest that a more "inclusive" approach to selecting donor hearts and transplant recipients can enable hospitals to successfully treat more patients who need transplants, they said. "We ... made strategic changes in donor an...
Coronavirus: ‘Widespread virus growth across the country’

Coronavirus: ‘Widespread virus growth across the country’

Health
There is widespread growth of the epidemic across the country and the R number has risen to between 1.1 and 1.4, say the government's scientific advisers.Officials are warning of "far worse things to come" as cases are thought to exceed 6,000 a day in England. And the scientist behind the Covid Symptom Study app said it appeared to be "the start of a second wave".The developments come as new England-wide restrictions are being discussed. At least 13.5 million people, roughly one-in-five of the UK population, are facing some form of local restrictions. Cases of the virus and hospital admissions for Covid-19 are doubling every seven to eight days in the UK. On Friday, there were 4,322 new lab-confirmed cases of the virus - a rise of nearly 1,000 on yesterda...
Increased demand, efficacy among experts’ flu vaccine concerns in COVID-19 era

Increased demand, efficacy among experts’ flu vaccine concerns in COVID-19 era

Health
Sept. 18 (UPI) -- Manufacturers have ramped up production of the 2020-21 flu vaccine during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the two viruses expected to overlap this winter, and it still may not be enough to meet demand, experts told UPI. The manufacturers of flu vaccines approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration said they expect, collectively, to produce up to 198 million doses for the winter season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Advertisement This is a 17% increase over the number of doses produced last year, the agency said. It is unclear, however, whether even increased production will be sufficient to meet what is expected to be a surge in demand. "If things are particularly bad [with the flu this winter], we could have a reduced number of doses availab...