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Negative social media experiences lead to loneliness in young adults, study says

Negative social media experiences lead to loneliness in young adults, study says

Health
Jan. 22 (UPI) -- Negative experiences online may bring about higher rates of loneliness among social media users, a study says. Every 10 percent increase in negative interactions on social media made the study participants 13 percent more likely to feel lonely, according to new research published Tuesday in the American Journal of Health Promotion. "Social media is, seemingly, about connecting people. So it is surprising and interesting that our investigations reveal social media being linked to loneliness," study lead author Brian Primack, director of University of Pittsburgh's Center for Research on Media Technology and Health, said in a news release. "Perceived social isolation, which is a synonym for loneliness, is associated with poor health outcomes, such as high blood pressure, hea...
Promising new drug for aggressive stage IV breast cancer encounters setback

Promising new drug for aggressive stage IV breast cancer encounters setback

Health
Federal approval of a highly anticipated breast cancer drug was delayed by the Food and Drug Administration this week. The drug, sacituzumab govitecan, which is produced by Immunomedics, was previously designated a "breakthrough therapy" by the FDA “based on preliminary evidence that it demonstrates substantial improvement over existing therapies for a life threatening disease.” According to Michael Pehl, president and CEO of Immunomedics, the reason the medication was not approved for wide availability was due to “issues...exclusively focused on chemistry, manufacturing and control matters” and that “no new clinical or preclinical data need[s] to be generated.” He added, “We are going to request a meeting with the FDA as soon as possible &hell...
Common gut bacteria blocks effects of Parkinson's drugs, study says

Common gut bacteria blocks effects of Parkinson's drugs, study says

Health
Jan. 18 (UPI) -- A common gut bacteria can block a common Parkinson's disease medicine from working on patients with the disease, a new study says. Gut bacteria metabolizes levodopa, a common Parkinson's medication, into dopamine, a neurotransmitter in the brain. Since dopamine can't pass through the blood-brain barrier, it saps the levodopa of its effectiveness, according to a study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications. "It is well established that gut bacteria can affect the brain," Sahar El Aidy, an assistant professor in microbiology at University of Groningen and study lead investigator, said in a news release. "There is a continuous chemical dialogue between gut bacteria and the brain, the so-called gut-brain axis." The less effect a normal dosage of levodopa has on...