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More cuts to care on way – council chiefs

More cuts to care on way – council chiefs

Health
Vulnerable old and disabled people will see cuts to vital care services and higher charges, council chiefs say.The annual budget survey by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services shows councils expect to spend £21.4bn this year in England.While this is a rise from £20.8bn last year, the cost of inflation combined with growing demand means this will not be enough, ADASS said.The warning comes as ministers prepare to unveil plans to reform the system.A green paper on social care is expected to be published in the coming months. Vulnerable facing 'bleak future'ADASS said it was desperately needed given the pressures on councils - local government has seen cuts in the amount of funding it gets from central government over the past de...
Machine learning can predict low blood pressure during surgery

Machine learning can predict low blood pressure during surgery

Health
June 11 (UPI) -- A new algorithm can predict potentially dangerous low blood pressure during surgery. Researchers have developed machine learning than can identify hypotension as much as 15 minutes before it occurs, and are correct about 84 percent of the time. The findings were published Monday in the journal Anesthesiology. "Physicians haven't had a way to predict hypotension during surgery, so they have to be reactive, and treat it immediately without any prior warning," Dr. Maxime Cannesson, a professor of anesthesiology at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, said in a press release. "Being able to predict hypotension would allow physicians to be proactive instead of reactive." Canesson said the tool can save lives -- even with a warning only 10 to 15 minutes ahead of time. "By findi...
Study: Inexpensive nasal brush test can diagnose asthma

Study: Inexpensive nasal brush test can diagnose asthma

Health
June 11 (UPI) -- Researchers have developed a simple nasal brush test than can accurately identify mild to moderate asthma in a cheaper way than pulmonary diagnostics. The most common tests for asthma are spirometry, which measures how much and how quickly air can blow out of lungs, and methacholine, which is an agent that, when inhaled, causes the airways to spasm and narrow if asthma is present. But the equipment is not usually available in primary care settings and they can't differentiate between asthma and other respiratory diseases, researchers say. In addition, people may feel dizzy and faint doing the breathing tests. The nasal brush -- which works the way it sounds -- can more easily and comfortably differentiate an asthma diagnosis from other respiratory conditions, including a...
New measures to protect doctors after Bawa-Garba case

New measures to protect doctors after Bawa-Garba case

Health
New measures designed to improve patient safety and protect doctors and nurses when mistakes are made, are to be announced by the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt.It comes after concerns were raised following the case of Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba, who was struck off after the death of a six-year-old boy.Mr Hunt said staff should be able to learn from their mistakes.Hundreds of medics also signed an open letter in support of Dr Bawa-Garba.She was found guilty of mistakes in the care of six-year-old Jack Adcock, from Leicestershire, who died of sepsis in 2011.Following a government review ordered by Mr Hunt, new measures are being introduced.These include: the investigation of every hospital death by a medical examiner or coroner data on do...
Tea towels 'can cause food poisoning'

Tea towels 'can cause food poisoning'

Health
Multi-use of tea towels is putting households at risk of food poisoning, research suggests.Scientists from the University of Mauritius examined 100 towels that had been used for a month. They found E.coli was more likely to be found on towels used for multiple jobs, such as wiping utensils and cleaning surfaces, as well as drying hands.It was also more likely to be found on damp towels or those in households where meat was eaten. Multiple use increases the chance of cross-contamination of potential pathogens that can spread bacteria and lead to food poisoning.The government recommends washing or changing dish cloths, tea towels, sponges and oven gloves regularly and letting them dry before re-use. The research is being presented at the annual meeting of t...