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The Best Healthy Salsa Recipes

The Best Healthy Salsa Recipes

Health
Homemade salsaLow in calories and packed with fresh produce, salsa is a super-healthy way to add flavor to dishes like salad, fish, grilled chicken, and the classic tortilla chip. If you typically reach for the jarred stuff, you may be surprised to learn that you can actually get more nutrients and richer flavor from homemade salsa. Since you're making it yourself, you can control ingredients like salt to know exactly what you're getting in every scoop.RELATED: 26 Low-Fat Mexican Food RecipesPlus, homemade salsa is incredibly easy to whip up, and you can incorporate unexpected add-ins to transform the recipe way beyond the basic tomatoes-and-onions version (when was the last time you had jicama or cranberries in a store-bought salsa, for example?). Here, our favorite healthy homemade salsa
7 Things You Should Know About Matcha

7 Things You Should Know About Matcha

Health
I’ve been getting asked about matcha a whole lot lately. I heard that matcha shots were the “it beverage” at New York Fashion Week, and many dedicated coffee lovers are ditching java in favor of matcha. If you’re curious about this trendy beverage, here are seven things you should know.RELATED: Join Health for a Weekend at Canyon Ranch Wellness Resort in April!It's a special form of green teaMatcha literally means "powdered tea." When you order traditional green tea, components from the leaves get infused into the hot water, then the leaves are discarded. With matcha, you’re drinking the actual leaves, which have been finely powdered and made into a solution, traditionally by mixing about a teaspoon of matcha powder with a third cup of hot water (heated to less than a boil), which is then
This Is What Health's Food Director Eats in a Day (Dark Chocolate Made the Cut!)

This Is What Health's Food Director Eats in a Day (Dark Chocolate Made the Cut!)

Health
Because of my work as Health's Food Director,people will sometimes ask if I either cook elaborate, multi-course meals every night, or if I never cook at home since it’s part of my job. The reality is actually neither of these—I’m a busy working mom, and I cook often for my family (my husband is an excellent cook and does a lot of it as well), but the meals we make are usually pretty quick and simple. Here's what I eat in a typical day.BreakfastEvery morning, the first thing I do is down a big glass of water and take my vitamins.Water just helps get me going. I drink a lot of water all day (I don’t count glasses or ounces, but I’m always sipping), and that glass first thing is a good jump-start. After that, I make a cup of Bulletproof coffee: in my Vitamix, I blend about 12 oz. coffee with
Social media pressure is linked to cosmetic procedure boom

Social media pressure is linked to cosmetic procedure boom

Health
Young people are turning to cosmetic procedures such as botox and dermal fillers as a result of social media pressure, according to a report. A study by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics says government must protect people from an unregulated industry.The report also condemns makeover apps and online plastic surgery games aimed at children as young as nine.The authors fear such apps are contributing to growing anxieties around body image.Much of the cosmetic procedures industry is unregulated so reliable data on its size is hard to come by. In 2015 one market research company estimated the UK market could be worth as much as £3.6bn. But there is little doubt it has grown significantly over the past decade. Focus on body imageThe report identifies several factors that are encouraging young
Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Back pain patients with depression often prescribed opioids

Health
WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 -- Patients with low back pain who are depressed are more likely to be prescribed opioids, and to be prescribed higher doses, a new study finds.Low back pain is a leading cause of disability in the United States and the most common reason for opioid prescriptions, the researchers said."There is strong evidence that depressed patients are at greater risk for misuse and overdose of opioids," said study senior author Dr. John Markman. He directs the University of Rochester Medical Center's Translational Pain Research Program, in New York.The analysis of nationwide data on nearly 5,400 people from 2004 to 2009 found that patients with back pain who screened positive for depression were more than twice as likely to be prescribed an opioid painkiller. Over a year's time,...