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The boys trapped in the Thailand cave could face an unusual disease

The boys trapped in the Thailand cave could face an unusual disease

Health
As the rescue efforts for the 12 boys and their coach trapped in a flooded Thailand cave have continued, the world has been hoping for the entire group's safe return to the surface. But after surviving the weather conditions, severe body stresses and unimaginable emotional distress of being trapped for days in dark, wet caverns, the 13 have more challenges ahead. All that time inside the caverns has exposed them to a dangerous and rare infection, often called "cave disease." What is 'cave disease?' Cave disease, also called speleonosis, is an infection with a fungus called Histoplasma capsulatum. It was first described in the 1940s as an “unusual” lung disease affecting a group of men camping in an abandoned storm cellar. The fungus is naturally found all over the world...
Trauma suffered in childhood echoes across generations, study finds

Trauma suffered in childhood echoes across generations, study finds

Health
Trauma in childhood echoes through generations, according to new research that could have implications for thousands of migrant children recently separated from parents at the U.S. border. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and published today in Pediatrics, finds that traumatic events in childhood increase the risk of mental health and behavioral problems not just for that person but also for their children. “Early-life experiences -- stressful or traumatic ones in particular -- have intergenerational consequences for child behavior and mental health," the lead author, Adam Schickedanz, clinical instructor in pediatrics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, told ABC News. "This demonstrates one way in which all of us carry...
Protein discovery may lead to gonorrhea vaccine, new antibiotic

Protein discovery may lead to gonorrhea vaccine, new antibiotic

Health
July 6 (UPI) -- New research has identified a protein that fuels the bacteria that causes gonorrhea, which could open the door for new antibiotics and even a vaccine. The findings, published Thursday in PLOS Pathogens, are an important step in fighting the microbe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is considered a "superbug" because of its resistance to all antibiotics for treating infections. The infection, a sexually transmitted disease that affects 78 million people each year, can be extremely damaging if left untreated or treated improperly. It can lead to endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, epididymitis and infertility. And it can increase the risk of blindness in babies born to infected mothers. "The infections very often are silent," Oregon State University re...
Natural lipid could lead to powerful anti-inflammatory

Natural lipid could lead to powerful anti-inflammatory

Health
July 6 (UPI) -- Researchers at the Natural Institutes of Health have identified a naturally occurring lipid that disease-causing bacterium use to damage a host's immune response and increase the chance of infection. The discovery may also mean a new potent inflammation therapy against bacterial and viral diseases. Lipids, which are waxy, fatty acids, are known to help the bacteria that causes the disease tularemia. The bacteria, Francisella tularensis, uses the lipid to suppress host inflammation when infecting mouse and human cells. In a new study, published in the Journal of Innate Immunity, researchers from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases found a form of the lipid phosphatidylethanoloamine, or PE, present in the bacterium. The scientists considered its pote...
HIV vaccine shows promise in human trial

HIV vaccine shows promise in human trial

Health
An HIV vaccine that has the potential to protect people around the world from the virus has shown promising results. The treatment, which aims to provide immunity against various strains of the virus, produced an anti-HIV immune system response in tests on 393 people, a study in the Lancet found. It also protected some monkeys from a virus that is similar to HIV. More testing is now needed to determine if the immune response produced can prevent HIV infection in people. About 37 million people worldwide live with HIV or Aids, and there are an estimated 1.8 million new cases every year.But despite advances in treatment for HIV, both a cure and a vaccine for the virus have so far remained elusive. The drug Prep, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is effective at ...