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Why It’s Risky to Try to Eat Like a Celebrity, According to a Nutritionist

Why It’s Risky to Try to Eat Like a Celebrity, According to a Nutritionist

Health
Stars' food diaries are fun to read—but remember that every body has different needs. It's hard to resist headlines that promise to reveal what stars like Jessica Alba and Jenna Dewan Tatum eat in a day—in hopes of discovering their dietary secrets to flat abs and glowy skin. (If only it were that simple!) But as a nutritionist who works with celebrities, I strongly advise against copying exactly what they eat in a day. Let me explain why.First and foremost, what works for a particular star may not be what works for you. Sure, adopting your favorite celeb's general diet philosophy (say, clean eating or vegetarianism) may help you reach your healthy goals. But the specific foods and portions you consume—as well as how often you eat per day—should be based on your own age,
Peanut allergy treatment 'lasts up to four years'

Peanut allergy treatment 'lasts up to four years'

Health
An oral treatment for peanut allergy is still effective four years after it was administered, a study has found.Children were given a probiotic, with a peanut protein, daily for 18 months. When tested one month later, 80% could tolerate peanuts without any allergic symptoms and after four years, 70% of them were still able to eat peanuts without suffering any side-effects.Food allergies have risen dramatically in recent decades, with peanut allergy one of the most deadly. Lead researcher Prof Mimi Tang, of Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, said half the children were consuming peanuts regularly while others were only eating them infrequently. "The importance of this finding is that these children were able to eat peanuts like children who don't have peanut allergy and stil...
Nearly 4 million people die from asthma each year, says COPD

Nearly 4 million people die from asthma each year, says COPD

Health
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 -- Two major chronic lung diseases -- asthma and COPD -- kill nearly 4 million people worldwide annually, a new report finds.The study calculates that 3.2 million people died in 2015 from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) -- a group of lung conditions that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, often tied to smoking. Asthma caused another 400,000 deaths, the report found.While asthma is more common, COPD is much more deadly. And while both conditions can be treated, many people remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In addition, in many countries, treatment -- if it exists at all -- may be at insufficient levels, the research team added."Although much of the burden [from these illnesses] is either preventable or treatable with affordable interventions, ...
Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Health
A new study published in the European Heart Journal Monday finds that being overweight increases your risk of coronary heart disease, even if you are otherwise considered healthy, destabilizing the common conception that someone can be "fat but fit." "Our findings suggest that if a patient is overweight or obese, all efforts should be made to help them get back to a healthy weight, regardless of other factors. Even if their blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol appear within the normal range, excess weight is still a risk factor," Dr. Camille Lassale, the lead author of the study said in a statement to the Imperial College London announcing the findings. Researchers analyzed thousands of incidences of coronary heart disease over a more than 12-year period in 10 countries in Europe...
Genetic risk factors for disease can be affected by environment

Genetic risk factors for disease can be affected by environment

Health
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- A study out Wednesday by a team of U.S. and German researchers has found that genetic variants affect how much gene expression changes in response to disease.The study, published in Nature Communications, involved researchers analyzing blood from 134 volunteers, and treated monocytes, or white blood cells, in the laboratory with three components to simulate infection with bacteria or virus."Our defense mechanisms against microbial pathogens rely on white blood cells that are specialized to detect infection. Upon encounter of microbes, these cells trigger cellular defense programs via activating and repressing the expression of hundreds of genes," said Dr. Veit Hornung of the Ludwig-Maxmilians-Universität in Munich, formerly from the University of Bonn.Researchers analyzed