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Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Health
Aug. 15 (UPI) -- A study in mice by the National Institutes of Health has uncovered a potential broad-spectrum antiviral that may be effective against herpesvirus.Two-thirds of the world's population are infected with HSV-1 and roughly 500 million have HSV-2, according to the World Health Organization.When a person is infected with the herpes simplex virus, or HSV, the virus can persist in the body in a latent form, which can reactivate, causing recurrent infection.HSV can cause a variety of diseases, including oral cold sores, genital lesions, serious eye conditions and blindness.Recurrent HSV can lead to ocular HSV infections causing corneal scarring, and neonatal infections can lead to developmental delays, neurological issues and death. People infected with HSV are also at an increased...
5 Things You Need to Know About Gluten

5 Things You Need to Know About Gluten

Health
Unless you've been on a media-free diet, you probably saw Jimmy Kimmel Live's hilarious "What is Gluten?" video, in which none of the gluten avoiders interviewed could explain exactly what gluten is. The truth is, most of my gluten-free clients don't really know what it is either (check out my previous post Your 5 Worst Gluten-Free Mistakes), but they do know that they feel better when they avoid it.But there's a problem: I noticed that some of the things people said in Kimmel's video, like where they think gluten is found, were just plain incorrect. The video has more than 2 million views, so I thought it would be helpful to provide a primer. Here are five things you should know before starting a gluten-free diet, in order to reap the benefits and avoid the pitfalls.Gluten is a proteinYup...
Here’s Why It Feels Like You Always Have Room for Dessert

Here’s Why It Feels Like You Always Have Room for Dessert

Health
How many times have you eaten a well-balanced meal, declared yourself full ... and then skimmed the dessert menu? Or considered digging into the pint of mint chocolate chip in your freezer? Turns out there’s a scientific reason for this phenomenon. It’s called sensory-specific satiety.Translation: When you eat one type of food, you develop a decreased appetite for that food compared to other foods with different tastes, textures, and colors. Sensory-specific satiety helps explain why it's oh-so-challenging to avoid overeating at a buffet. It’s also why you always seem to have room for dessert.So if you’re hardwired this way (it’s science, right?), what can you do to avoid ending a meal feeling uncomfortably full? Here are three techniques to combat your brain’s desire to have it all, so yo
Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k

Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k

Health
A national breast cancer charity is being investigated after its founder paid herself £31,000, in breach of charity law.Wendy Watson, who launched the National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline in 1996, has resigned as a trustee. Financial irregularities were uncovered by the Charity Commission, which has issued an official warning for "significant breaches of trust".Lawyers for Mrs Watson and the charity described the payments as "an error".Mrs Watson, of Derbyshire, founded the charity four years after she became the first woman in the UK to have a pre-emptive mastectomy. Five years ago she was appointed MBE for services to people with breast cancer.The pre-emptive mastectomy procedure was made famous in 2013 when American actress Angelina Jolie had the surgery.The charity was set up to
New research shows fat-shaming can be a health hazard

New research shows fat-shaming can be a health hazard

Health
The practice of fat shaming at the doctor's office can be harmful to both the mental and physical health of a patient, according to a comprehensive new review of research published Thursday. "Disrespectful treatment and medical fat shaming ... is stressful and can cause patients to delay health care seeking or avoid interacting with providers," the abstract to the new review published Thursday by Joan C. Chrisler and Angela Barney, researchers at Connecticut College's Department of Psychology stated. The review examined 46 past studies, which looked doctors' biases towards obesity and also compared patients' reports of fat shaming from their doctors with their health outcomes. Researchers found that fat shaming from a doctor can take a significant negative toll on a patient's health, as...