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Blood pressure drug linked to death risk, study says

Blood pressure drug linked to death risk, study says

Health
March 18 (UPI) -- A well-known drug used to control blood pressure and angina has been linked to out-of-hospital heart failure, a new study says. High-doses of either nifedipine or amlodipine, two forms of the drug dihydropyridine, are both associated with a high risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to findings presented Monday at EHRA 2019. "Nifedipine and amlodipine are often used by many cardiologists and other physicians, and the choice often depends on the prescriber's preference and personal experience," Hanno Tan, a researcher at Academic Medical Center and study author, said in a news release. "Both drugs are generally considered to be equally effective and safe and neither has been associated with sudden cardiac arrest." Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart quivers ...
Lower blood pressure boosts brain function in elderly, study says

Lower blood pressure boosts brain function in elderly, study says

Health
March 18 (UPI) -- Having lower blood pressure can boost brain function in older adults, a new study says. When elderly people took medicine to keep their systolic blood pressure around 130 mm for three years, they were less likely to suffer a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular event, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. "I think it's an important clinical finding and a very hopeful one for elderly people who have vascular disease of the brain and hypertension," said William B. White, a researcher at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine's Calhoun Cardiology Center and study principal investigators. "With the intensive 24-hour blood pressure treatment we reduced the accrual of this brain damage by 40 p...
McDonald's: Tom Watson urges chain to drop Monopoly campaign

McDonald's: Tom Watson urges chain to drop Monopoly campaign

Health
A McDonald's Monopoly campaign which sees customers given the chance to win prizes including food is a "danger to public health", says MP Tom Watson.He is urging the fast food giant to drop the annual competition, which starts again this week, saying it encouraged people to order more.It comes as the government considers banning junk food adverts on TV before 9pm to tackle childhood obesity. McDonald's said "customer choice" was at the heart of its business. Mr Watson - who tackled his type 2 diabetes by adopting a healthier lifestyle and losing seven stone - has asked Paul Pomroy, chief executive of McDonald's UK, to cancel the marketing campaign, the Observer reported.But McDonald's argued that people can take part by buying some of the healthier foods ...
Children's noses 'hold clues' to serious lung infections

Children's noses 'hold clues' to serious lung infections

Health
Examining the bacteria and viruses in the noses of children could give clues to improve the diagnosis and treatment of severe lung infections, a new study has found. Lung infections are a leading cause of death in under-fives worldwide. The study found the make-up of bacteria and viruses was altered in the noses of children with respiratory infections. Researchers say the study helps explain why some children are more prone to developing infections than others. It could also be key to preventing serious lung infections. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found that the differences indicated the severity of the condition and could help doctors predict how long the child needs to stay in hospital.They said that in less serious cases, it could reduce...
Heart attacks less frequent, less deadly since 1990s

Heart attacks less frequent, less deadly since 1990s

Health
March 15 (UPI) -- Fewer Americans are having heart attacks these days, and those that do are dying less often, thanks to heart attack prevention techniques, a new study says. Since the mid-90s, hospitalizations for heart attack have fallen by 38 percent, according to research published Friday in JAMA Open. The 30-day mortality rate for heart attacks has also decreased to an all-time low of 12 percent. "We are now at historic lows in the rates of heart attacks and deaths associated with heart attacks," said Harlan Krumholz, a cardiologist at Yale University and study lead author, in a news release. The study tracked more than four million Medicare patients between 1995 and 2014, which the researchers call the largest heart attack study in the United States ever. The researchers attribute...