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16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge: study

16% of recovered patients test positive for COVID-19 weeks after discharge: study

Health
May 22 (UPI) -- Up to one in six people declared recovered from COVID-19 and discharged from the hospital still test positive for the virus up to three weeks later, meaning they still could be contagious, according to a study published Friday by JAMA Network Open. The findings reinforce that researchers still are learning about the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, including how it affects those infected and how it's spread, said Dr. M. Anthony Moody, an associate professor of pediatrics and immunology at Duke University School of Medicine. "I think we need to take this study, and every other study [on COVID-19] with an appropriate degree of attention and skepticism ... because scientists are supposed to be skeptical -- that's how we continue to discover new things," said Moody, who was not p...
Risk for MS 30% higher for those living in cities, study finds

Risk for MS 30% higher for those living in cities, study finds

Health
May 22 (UPI) -- City-dwellers are nearly 30 percent more likely to be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis than those living in more rural areas, a study presented Friday at the European Academy of Neurology Virtual Congress has found. Based on the results, which will also be published in European Journal of Neurology, air pollution could be a risk factor for the development of the disease, according to the authors, who conducted their research in Italy. "It is well recognized that immune diseases such as MS are associated with multiple factors, both genetic and environmental," co-author Dr. Roberto Bergamaschi, of the IRCCS Mondino Foundation in Pavia, Italy, said in a statement. "We believe that air pollution interacts through several mechanisms in the development of MS and the results of...
New urine-based kidney stone test delivers results in 30 minutes

New urine-based kidney stone test delivers results in 30 minutes

Health
May 22 (UPI) -- A new urine-based testing system can diagnose people with kidney stones in 30 minutes or less, a study published Friday in the journal Science Advances has found. Faster test results mean those with the painful condition can start treatment -- and hopefully recover -- sooner. Current testing approaches take up to 10 days to produce results. "Since the result will be available immediately, such as during an office visit, it will tell the doctor the cause of the stone and guide dietary and pharmacologic interventions," Pak Kin Wong, principal investigator on the study, told UPI. "The doctor can also use the device to monitor the response of the patient to treatment and indicate the need for other treatment options," said Wong, who is professor of biomedical and mechanical e...
Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Coronavirus: Immune clue sparks treatment hope

Health
UK scientists are to begin testing a treatment that it is hoped could counter the effects of Covid-19 in the most seriously ill patients.It has been found those with the most severe form of the disease have extremely low numbers of an immune cell called a T-cell. T-cells clear infection from the body.The clinical trial will evaluate if a drug called interleukin 7, known to boost T-cell numbers, can aid patients' recovery.It involves scientists from the Francis Crick Institute, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital.They have looked at immune cells in the blood of 60 Covid-19 patients and found an apparent crash in the numbers of T-cells. Prof Adrian Hayday from the Crick Institute said it was a "great surprise" to see what was happening w...
Aggressive testing, quarantining can prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in senior facilities, study finds

Aggressive testing, quarantining can prevent COVID-19 outbreaks in senior facilities, study finds

Health
May 21 (UPI) -- Proactive testing and strict quarantining procedures at assisted-living facilities can help prevent outbreaks of COVID-19 among residents and the staff, a study published Thursday by JAMA Internal Medicine found. Taking this approach at an unnamed facility in Seattle effectively limited cases of the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, to six -- four among 80 residents and two among 62 staff members -- researchers said. "Assisted-living facilities are vulnerable to COVID-19, even though residents are in their own apartments, and older adults can be asymptomatic, so testing is key after an exposure to determine who may be infected," study co-author Dr. Alison C. Roxby, assistant professor of medicine and global health at the University of Washington, told UPI. Nursing homes, assis...