News That Matters

Health

NHS still reliant on 'archaic' fax machines

NHS still reliant on 'archaic' fax machines

Health
Hospitals are still reliant on "archaic" fax machines with thousands still in use, a survey shows.Senior doctors said the continued use of the outdated technology was "ludicrous", and modern forms of communication were urgently needed. The poll, by the Royal College of Surgeons using freedom of information laws, revealed nearly 9,000 fax machines were in use across England.Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Trust topped the list, relying on 603 machines. "Alongside innovation like artificial intelligence and robot-assisted surgery, NHS hospital trusts remain stubbornly attached to using archaic fax machines for a significant proportion of their communications. This is ludicrous," said Richard Kerr, chair of the Royal College of Surgeons' Co...
'Virtual reality cured my fear of heights'

'Virtual reality cured my fear of heights'

Health
Fay Nugent developed a fear of heights in her 30s. "It began after I went on a girls' weekend away," she says."We had gone on an adventure activity called a tree-top walk. "I managed to climb up to do it - but then when it came to stepping out on to the high ropes, I just couldn't do it. "I felt physically ill and panicked, even though I knew I was perfectly safe."Her phobia got worse over the next few years, to the point that it stopped her doing everyday things. "I went to a concert at Wembley to see Take That," she says."It's a massive venue and our seats were at the back, high up. "I tried to go up there to take my seat - but all of a sudden I had this feeling of utter panic. "It was a bit like in the cartoons when the charac...
'All of Us' biobank to store 34 million samples for medical research

'All of Us' biobank to store 34 million samples for medical research

Health
July 11 (UPI) -- On the sprawling Mayo Clinic campus in Minnesota, a 60,000-square foot-building houses one of the most important projects of the esteemed 154-year-old medical institution. Eventually, the climate-controlled, highly secured building in Rochester will hold 34 million samples -- blood, urine and saliva -- collected from 1 million people. The National Institute of Health's All of Us project is collecting those samples from volunteers around the nation in a quest for detailed health profiles to advance medical care worldwide. "If we take a look at medical research, drug discoveries, diagnostic discoveries, how to detect disease, all of this is research," Dr. Stephen Thibodeau, program director for the Mayo Clinic Biobank, told UPI. "All of the researchers use repositories. Yo...

https://www.health.com

Health
Welcome! To bring you the best content on our sites and applications, Meredith partners with third party advertisers to serve digital ads, including personalized digital ads. Those advertisers use tracking technologies to collect information about your activity on our sites and applications and across the Internet and your other apps and devices. You always have the choice to experience our sites without personalized advertising based on your web browsing activity by visiting the DAA’s Consumer Choice page, the NAI's website, and/or the EU online choices page, from each of your browsers or devices. To avoid personalized advertising based on your mobile app activity, you can install the DAA’s AppChoices app here. You can find much more information about your privacy choices ...
Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Drugs carried in cellular 'backpacks' help destroy solid tumors in mice

Health
July 10 (UPI) -- Nanoparticle "backpacks" with immune-stimulating drugs successfully helped T cells destroy solid tumors in mice, researchers report. Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who developed the method found it could enhance the T cells' activity without harmful side effects. In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the researchers report that 60 percent of treated animals' tumors disappeared completely in an early test of the method. The drugs are made of a gel from molecules of cytokine IL-15 held together by a cross-linker that degrades when the T cell reaches a tumor and is activated. Nanoparticles are between 1 and 100 nanometers in size -- comparatively, a human hair is 75,000 nanometers thick. "We found you could greatly improve ...