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7 Secretly Unhealthy Foods

7 Secretly Unhealthy Foods

Health
This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com. You know how some sneakers are specifically engineered for workouts and others, it turns out, are suited for nothing more than making fashion statements? Well, foods are like that too. Some are dressed up to look like they’re good for you when in fact they’re anything but. When you’re trying to eat well, it can be maddening when unhealthful impostors—filled with sugar, fat, and sodium—undo your good work. Here’s how to spot and stop seven of them.Energy BarsJust because they come in a tiny package that says they’re loaded with vitamin and minerals, energy bars are not necessarily a healthy choice. In fact, “a lot of them are nothing more than glorified candy bars,” says Sari Greaves, RD, nutrition director for Step Ahead Weight Loss Cente
Healthy Food and Drink Awards 2018

Healthy Food and Drink Awards 2018

Health
Win a Luxury Soho Spa Day Do you have a favourite healthy food product or drink you’d love to tell everyone about? Now’s your chance!Women’s Fitness and Health & Fitness magazines have joined forces to launch the Healthy Food Drink Awards 2018 – voted for by you! The awards will recognise the very best food and drink products that help keep British women healthy. From cereal bars and savoury snacks to smoothies and juices, winners of the Awards will be announced in the April 2018 issues of WF and H&F. So don’t delay, vote for your top products today!Joanna Knight & Mary ComberWomen’s Fitness and Health & FitnessMarshall Street Everyone Active, seconds from Carnaby street is a hidden oasis in the heart of Soho with a fitness suite, hot yoga studio, luxury spa, sauna, steam
Middle-aged told to walk faster

Middle-aged told to walk faster

Health
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceMiddle-aged people are being urged to walk faster to help stay healthy, amid concern high levels of inactivity may be harming their health. Officials at Public Health England said the amount of activity people did started to tail off from the age of 40.They are urging those between the ages of 40 and 60 to start doing regular brisk walks.Just 10 minutes a day could have a major impact, reducing the risk of early death by 15%, they say.But PHE estimates four out of every 10 40- to 60-year-olds do not even manage a brisk 10-minute walk each month.15% Reduction in risk of early death from at least one brisk 10 min walk per day 20% Less active than we were in the 1960s 15 miles Less walked a year on average than two decades ago BBCTo help, the govern...
What Is the Best Non-Pasta Pasta?

What Is the Best Non-Pasta Pasta?

Health
This article originally appeared on Time.com. Non-flour pastas are having a moment: You can now eat pasta made from brown rice, quinoa, lentils, chickpeas and more. But are they really healthier than the real deal? Here’s what nutrition experts have to say about which pasta alternatives are actually good for you.Vegetable noodles are the bestFresh vegetables used in the place of noodles are clearly the healthiest option. One popular way to make veggies like sweet potato, cucumber or zucchini look like noodles is to spiralize them, or use a machine to slice them into long, curly strands. You can then cook these so-called “zoodles,” if you wish, by boiling or sautéeing them. Other stringy veggies like spaghetti squash naturally have a similar pasta-like look.“From a nutritional standpoint, i
More evidence contact sports can affect the brain

More evidence contact sports can affect the brain

Health
TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 -- Playing contact sports like football or ice hockey can alter the structure and function of the brain, Canadian researchers report.Brain scans showed that these changes were particularly pronounced in sports that have the greatest risk of body contact."There is growing concern about the risk of collisions in sport. However, most of the research has focused on retired professional athletes with decades of exposure to head impacts," said lead researcher Nathan Churchill. He's a post-doctoral fellow in the neuroscience research program at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto."Far less is known about the consequences of repeated body-to-body contact for young, active athletes," he said.In a group of college athletes, researchers found differences in the brains of both men...