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An RD-Approved Guide to Healthy Snacking at Work

An RD-Approved Guide to Healthy Snacking at Work

Health
Whether your weakness is nonstop grazing or a "treat yourself" tendency, here's how to clean up your office picks. Whether your weakness is nonstop grazing or a "treat yourself" tendency, here's how to clean up your office diet.Your occasional splurge becomes a regular thingThe makeover: It happens all the time: An afternoon treat to break up a stressful workday—like a mocha topped with whipped cream or peanut butter pretzels—progresses from a once-in-a-while indulgence to a daily habit. If you've developed "treat creep," as I call it, swap your goodie for a healthy substitute for 30 days, then reintroduce it in a scheduled way (for example, have it on the first Friday of each month). The splurge will become special again, and you'll likely slash hundreds of
Researchers: CTE was detected in living former NFL player

Researchers: CTE was detected in living former NFL player

Health
Nov. 16 (UPI) -- For the first time, research has confirmed that scientists successfully detected chronic traumatic encephalopathy -- known commonly as CTE -- in a living former professional football player.Scientists detected signs of the dementia-like disease in former player Fred McNeill four years ago, but it's not possible to confirm CTE until after a patient's death. McNeill died in 2015, and confirmation he had the disease was made last week in the journal Neurosurgery, scientists said Wednesday."The importance of this one today is that this is the first time to have a scan which shows brain degeneration of CTE in a living person and then to have that person die and it correlates with the autopsy," Dr. Julian Bailes, a neurosurgeon at NorthShore University in Illinois, said.Research...
Research refutes theory linking family income, genetics, brain development

Research refutes theory linking family income, genetics, brain development

Health
Nov. 17 (UPI) -- Researchers have debunked a popular theory linking socioeconomic status, genetics and cognitive development.Several studies have suggested genetics have a stronger influence on brain development among children from more affluent households. Some scientists have suggested the link between wealth and genetic influence is especially strong in the United States.But new analysis of birth and school records suggests the influence of nature and nurture -- genes and environment -- are the same for everyone, regardless of socioeconomic status.Researchers published their findings this week in the journal PNAS."While children from higher socio-economic status backgrounds have much better cognitive outcomes on average than those from lower socio-economic status households, genetics ap...
Big House victory for GOP tax plan, but Senate fate unclear

Big House victory for GOP tax plan, but Senate fate unclear

Health
Republicans rammed a $ 1.5 trillion overhaul of business and personal income taxes through the House Thursday, edging toward the code's biggest rewrite in three decades and the first major legislative triumph for President Donald Trump and the GOP after 10 bumpy months of controlling government. The mostly party-line 227-205 vote masked more ominous problems in the Senate. There, a similar package received a politically awkward verdict from nonpartisan congressional analysts showing it would eventually produce higher taxes for low- and middle-income earners but deliver deep reductions for those better off. The Senate bill was approved late Thursday by the Finance Committee and sent to the full Senate on a party-line 14-12 vote. Like the House measure, it would slash the corporate tax rate...
First gene-editing in human body attempt

First gene-editing in human body attempt

Health
Gene-editing has been attempted on cells inside a patient, in a world first by doctors in California.Brian Madeux, 44 from Arizona, was given the experimental treatment to try to correct a defect in his DNA that causes Hunter's syndrome. Mr Madeux says he was prepared to take part in the trial as he is "in pain every second of the day".It is too soon to know whether or not the gene-editing has worked in Mr Madeux's case. Hunter's syndrome is rare. Patients are born without the genetic instructions for an enzyme that breaks down long sugary molecules called mucopolysaccharides.Instead, they build up in the body and damage the brain and other organs. Severe cases are often fatal. "I actually thought I wouldn't live past my early 20s," said Mr Madeux.Patients need regular enzyme replacement t...