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Type 2 diabetics can reduce risk for cardiovascular disease, study says

Type 2 diabetics can reduce risk for cardiovascular disease, study says

Health
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- People with type 2 diabetes can significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease with proper treatment and not smoking, according to a study in Sweden. In a study published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at University of Gothenburg in Sweden said the increased risks could be theoretically eliminated. "This is definitely good news. The study shows that patients with type 2 diabetes with all risk factors within therapeutic target range had an extremely low risk of premature death, heart attack and stroke," author Aidin Rawshani, a doctoral student at the Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, said in a press release. Risk factors that can be controlled by medication, and cigarette abstinence, are blood pressure, long-term blood gl...
5 Fresh Foods to Always Pick Up in the Produce Aisle

5 Fresh Foods to Always Pick Up in the Produce Aisle

Health
The produce aisle can be a little overwhelming. You’ve got your super-fresh stuff, your local stuff, your organic stuff, your what-the-heck-is-that stuff. Maybe you have a baby in the cart, or a kid tugging on your hand to get to the cereal aisle as fast as humanly possible. Perhaps you have a short, tight list because you do most of your produce shopping at the farmer’s market or you’re in a CSA—a particularly smart move this time of year. Regardless of your supermarket strategy, there are five fresh foods I suggest you always pick up from this aisle. Nowadays, as a cook who makes Thai and Indian recipes as frequently as she does Italian ones, I find that I need these the most frequently, and curse myself when I do not have them. ...
How the humble cabbage can stop cancers

How the humble cabbage can stop cancers

Health
Scientists say they have discovered why some vegetables - including cabbage, broccoli and kale - can reduce the risk of bowel cancers. That cruciferous veg is good for the gut has never been in doubt but a detailed explanation has been elusive. The team at the Francis Crick Institute found anti-cancer chemicals were produced as the vegetables were digested.Cancer Research UK said there were plenty of reasons to eat more veg.The work focused on how vegetables alter the lining of the intestines, by studying mice and miniature bowels growing in the lab.Like the skin, the surface of the bowels is constantly being regenerated in a process that takes four to five days.But this constant renewal needs to be tightly controlled, otherwise it could lead to cancer or...
New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

New 'zombie' gene found in elephants could help humans fight cancer

Health
They may not be the fastest or the smartest or even the scariest, but when it comes to beating cancer, elephants are the superheroes of the living world. It's a phenomenon that has baffled scientists since the 1970s. After all, at their size, they should have a much higher rate of the disease. The larger a living thing, the more the cells, and the more the cells, the more chance one of them turns out to be cancerous -- which is why tall people are more vulnerable to the disease than short people and why Marmaduke is much more likely to get cancer than the Taco Bell Chihuahua. And yet, cancer rates among elephants is less than 5 percent, comparable to the rates in much smaller animals. The lifetime cancer mortality rate for humans is about 20 percent. So what gives? With all those cells...
Study: Cetuximab, radiation inferior to standard HPV throat cancer treatment

Study: Cetuximab, radiation inferior to standard HPV throat cancer treatment

Health
Aug. 14 (UPI) -- Treating HPV-positive throat cancer with cetuximab and radiation had worse overall and progression-free survival results compared with the current method of treatment with radiation and cisplatin, the National Institutes of Health revealed Tuesday. The trial, which was funded by the National Cancer Institute, was intended to test whether the combination would be less toxic than cisplatin but be just as effective for human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal cancer. The trial, which began in 2011, enrolled 849 patients at least 18 years old with the cancer to receive cetuximab or cisplatin with radiation. The trial is expected to finish in 2020. Cetuximab, which is manufactured under the brand name Erbitux by Eli Lilly, and cisplatin, which as sold as Platinol by Pfizer,...