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Nearly 4 million people die from asthma each year, says COPD

Nearly 4 million people die from asthma each year, says COPD

Health
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 -- Two major chronic lung diseases -- asthma and COPD -- kill nearly 4 million people worldwide annually, a new report finds.The study calculates that 3.2 million people died in 2015 from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) -- a group of lung conditions that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, often tied to smoking. Asthma caused another 400,000 deaths, the report found.While asthma is more common, COPD is much more deadly. And while both conditions can be treated, many people remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. In addition, in many countries, treatment -- if it exists at all -- may be at insufficient levels, the research team added."Although much of the burden [from these illnesses] is either preventable or treatable with affordable interventions, ...
Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Study suggests you cannot be 'fat but fit'

Health
A new study published in the European Heart Journal Monday finds that being overweight increases your risk of coronary heart disease, even if you are otherwise considered healthy, destabilizing the common conception that someone can be "fat but fit." "Our findings suggest that if a patient is overweight or obese, all efforts should be made to help them get back to a healthy weight, regardless of other factors. Even if their blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol appear within the normal range, excess weight is still a risk factor," Dr. Camille Lassale, the lead author of the study said in a statement to the Imperial College London announcing the findings. Researchers analyzed thousands of incidences of coronary heart disease over a more than 12-year period in 10 countries in Europe...
Genetic risk factors for disease can be affected by environment

Genetic risk factors for disease can be affected by environment

Health
Aug. 16 (UPI) -- A study out Wednesday by a team of U.S. and German researchers has found that genetic variants affect how much gene expression changes in response to disease.The study, published in Nature Communications, involved researchers analyzing blood from 134 volunteers, and treated monocytes, or white blood cells, in the laboratory with three components to simulate infection with bacteria or virus."Our defense mechanisms against microbial pathogens rely on white blood cells that are specialized to detect infection. Upon encounter of microbes, these cells trigger cellular defense programs via activating and repressing the expression of hundreds of genes," said Dr. Veit Hornung of the Ludwig-Maxmilians-Universität in Munich, formerly from the University of Bonn.Researchers analyzed
Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Herpesvirus study leads to discovery of broad-spectrum antiviral

Health
Aug. 15 (UPI) -- A study in mice by the National Institutes of Health has uncovered a potential broad-spectrum antiviral that may be effective against herpesvirus.Two-thirds of the world's population are infected with HSV-1 and roughly 500 million have HSV-2, according to the World Health Organization.When a person is infected with the herpes simplex virus, or HSV, the virus can persist in the body in a latent form, which can reactivate, causing recurrent infection.HSV can cause a variety of diseases, including oral cold sores, genital lesions, serious eye conditions and blindness.Recurrent HSV can lead to ocular HSV infections causing corneal scarring, and neonatal infections can lead to developmental delays, neurological issues and death. People infected with HSV are also at an increased...
5 Things You Need to Know About Gluten

5 Things You Need to Know About Gluten

Health
Unless you've been on a media-free diet, you probably saw Jimmy Kimmel Live's hilarious "What is Gluten?" video, in which none of the gluten avoiders interviewed could explain exactly what gluten is. The truth is, most of my gluten-free clients don't really know what it is either (check out my previous post Your 5 Worst Gluten-Free Mistakes), but they do know that they feel better when they avoid it.But there's a problem: I noticed that some of the things people said in Kimmel's video, like where they think gluten is found, were just plain incorrect. The video has more than 2 million views, so I thought it would be helpful to provide a primer. Here are five things you should know before starting a gluten-free diet, in order to reap the benefits and avoid the pitfalls.Gluten is a proteinYup...