News That Matters

Health

Gene-editing patient applications closer with new technique

Gene-editing patient applications closer with new technique

Health
April 13 (UPI) -- A new technique in gene editing greatly improves the technology's precision, so much so that it may one day treat some genetic diseases, according to a new study.At the University of Alberta, researchers have improved the accuracy using the guided biomachine in the body to seek out defective gene sequences in each cell and edit in the correct information. Their findings were published Friday in Nature Communications.They have filed a patent on their discovery and want to partner with a pharmaceutical company to use it for treatment of diseases, including muscular dystrophy, hemophilia and some cancers.The tool called Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, or CRISPR, combines a scissor-like protein called Cas9 and a guide molecule that seeks a precise s...
Regular excess drinking can take years off your life, study finds

Regular excess drinking can take years off your life, study finds

Health
Regularly drinking above the UK alcohol guidelines can take years off your life, according to a major report.The study of 600,000 drinkers estimated that having 10 to 15 alcoholic drinks every week could shorten a person's life by between one and two years.And they warned that people who drink more than 18 drinks a week could lose four to five years of their lives. The 2016 UK guidelines recommend no more than 14 units a week, which is six pints of beer or seven glasses of wine. Authors of the Lancet study said their findings backed up the new guidelines and also said they did not find an increased risk of death for light drinkers. Scientists, who compared the health and drinking habits of alcohol drinkers in 19 countries, modelled how much life a person could expect to lose if they drank...
This Popular Breakfast Dish Might Not Be as Healthy as You Think

This Popular Breakfast Dish Might Not Be as Healthy as You Think

Health
I guess it's back to the overnight oats. When juice shops started whipping up fresh, antioxidant-packed açaí bowls a few years ago, everyone freaked out. In addition to being delicious, the gorgeous, painstakingly styled bowls were topped with granola and fruit and claimed a long list of health benefits. Before long, the Brazilian superfood dish was dominating our Instagram feeds. And we get it: Who wouldn't want to chow down on something that looks and tastes like ice cream, but is actually healthy for you?While these bowls do tend to be high in antioxidants and fiber—making them an undeniably better breakfast choice than, say, a donut or chocolate croissant—let's talk about the sugar levels. A quick lo
The Best Healthy Burger Recipes

The Best Healthy Burger Recipes

Health
It’s not a summer cookout without seafood, so of course, this to-die-for burger is a must for your menu. Ask your store’s seafood counter to skin the salmon for you. Then you just chop, season, grill, and serve. Ingredients: Salmon fillet, baby spinach, panko (Japanese breadcrumbs), fresh lemon juice, fresh ginger, low-sodium soy sauce, sesame seeds, salt, black pepper, fat-free Greek yogurt, fresh dill, minced garlic, olive oil cooking spray, whole-wheat hamburger buns Calories: 463 Try this recipe: Sesame Seed-Crusted Salmon Burger With Yogurt SauceLet's block ads! (Why?) Food - Health.com
In opioid epidemic, some cities strain to afford OD antidote

In opioid epidemic, some cities strain to afford OD antidote

Health
On a Baltimore street corner, public health workers hand out a life-saving overdose antidote to residents painfully familiar with the ravages of America's opioid epidemic. But the training wraps up quickly; all the naloxone inhalers are claimed within 20 minutes. "We could've easily handed out hundreds of doses today. But we only had 24 kits. That goes fast," said Kelleigh Eastman, a health department worker assisting the city's bluntly dubbed "Don't Die" anti-overdose campaign. Cities like Baltimore are feeling the financial squeeze as they rely on naloxone to try and counteract rising overdose rates. Some hard-hit communities across the country are struggling to pay for dosages even at reduced prices. With more overdoses driven by synthetic opioids like fentanyl and carfentanil — so pot