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Statin use can reduce risk of serious bacterial bloodstream infection

Statin use can reduce risk of serious bacterial bloodstream infection

Health
Oct. 2 (UPI) -- Researchers have found that people who use statins to prevent cardiac disease have a lower risk of contracting a Staphylococcus aureus, a bloodstream infection.The study, published in the October edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, showed that patients using statins have a 27 percent lower risk of contracting S. aureus compared to those who do not take statins.Statins are used among the elderly with chronic preexisting conditions such as diabetes, kidney and liver disease.Researchers at the University Hospitals in Aalborg and Aarhus, Denmark, and the University Hospital in Seville, Spain, analyzed medical records for 30,000 people in Danish medical registries from a 12-year period, identifying 2,638 cases of community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia, or CA-SAB.Another 26,379 ...
This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Don’t Get Your Morning Coffee

This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Don’t Get Your Morning Coffee

Health
Caffeine withdrawal is for real. If a hot mug of joe or an icy cup of Starbucks is your preferred way to start the day, you've probably noticed that you feel, well, off when don't get your coffee fix. On those especially hectic mornings, you might even sort of hate the world. But that reaction isn't in your head, says Michael J. Kuhar, PhD, professor of neuropharmacology at Emory University. Caffeine can make you feel energized, alert, and less depressed, Kuhar explains. It can even improve your motor skills and learning ability. When you skip your usual stimulant high, you might feel down, drowsy, sluggish, clumsy, and irritable. You may also experience headaches, and a drop in blood pressure. In a Johns Hopkins ...
Officer's death intensifies scrutiny of herbal supplement

Officer's death intensifies scrutiny of herbal supplement

Health
Matt Dana was known around the Adirondack Mountain town where he grew up as a promising young police sergeant who worked hard to root out narcotics dealers. So it came as a shock to friends and co-workers when he died suddenly this summer and an autopsy attributed it to an overdose. It wasn't from drugs, but from kratom, an herbal supplement sold online and in convenience stores, gas stations and smoke shops. "It was the talk of the town. People were upset it was reported as an overdose," said Paul Maroun, mayor of Tupper Lake in the central Adirondacks 110 miles northwest of Albany. "It's not an illegal drug." Made from the leaf of a Southeast Asian plant, kratom (pronounced KRAY-tuhm) is touted as an energizer, potent pain reliever, and tool to wean people with addictions off heroin and...
Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Almost a quarter of dialysis patients back in hospital in 30 days

Health
SATURDAY, Sept. 30, 2017 -- Nearly one-quarter of kidney dialysis patients admitted to the hospital are readmitted within 30 days after discharge, a new study finds. In many cases, the readmissions are for a different problem than the one that led to the first hospitalization, according to the report.For the study, researchers reviewed data from nearly 391,000 initial hospitalizations of dialysis patients in the United States in 2013. Within 30 days after leaving the hospital, 22 percent of the patients had unplanned readmissions. Only 20 percent of those readmissions were for the same diagnosis as the first admission, the findings showed.Just 2 percent of all patients accounted for 20 percent of all readmissions. Women and younger people were more likely to be readmitted, the research...
NHS 'not fit for 21st Century', says chief hospital inspector

NHS 'not fit for 21st Century', says chief hospital inspector

Health
The NHS is not fit for the 21st Century, the new chief inspector of hospitals in England has said.Professor Ted Baker, who started the role last month, said the system had not adapted to deal with the growth in the population.In an interview with the Daily Telegraph, he said: "The model of care we have got is still the model we had in the 1960s and 70s."The Department of Health is yet to respond to his views.Prof Baker succeeded Sir Mike Richards overseeing the hospital division of the Care Quality Commission (CQC), having been his deputy since 2014.The former hospital medical director said the NHS had not modernised because of a historic lack of investment. He said: "One of the things I regret is that 15 or 20 years ago, when we could see the change in the population, the NHS did not chan...