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'Mind-blowing' cows hold clue to beating HIV

'Mind-blowing' cows hold clue to beating HIV

Health
Cows have shown an "insane" and "mind-blowing" ability to tackle HIV which will help develop a vaccine, say US researchers.In a first for immunisation, the animals rapidly produced special types of antibody that can neutralise HIV.It is thought cows evolved a supreme immune defence due to their complex and bacteria-packed digestive system.The US National Institutes of Health said the findings were of "great interest".HIV is a slippery and nefarious opponent. It mutates so readily that every time a patient's immune system finds a way of attacking the virus, HIV shifts its appearance. However, a small proportion of patients eventually develop "broadly neutralising antibodies" after years of infection. These attack parts the virus cannot change. A vaccine that could train the immune system to...
'Coffee Naps' Just Might Change Your Life. Here's Why

'Coffee Naps' Just Might Change Your Life. Here's Why

Health
The words "coffee" and "nap" don't usually go together. But a strategy that pairs the two actually makes sense—and could be the energy boost you need to make it through a crazy day.A coffee nap is exactly what it sounds like: You drink a cup of joe, then immediately take a snooze. While this may seem counterintuitive, the caffeine in coffee doesn’t kick in for about 30 minutes, so dozing off just after you drink your java is very possible. And that short sleep will provide its own energy punch: Power naps have been shown to improve alertness and performance.The ideal coffee nap is 30 minutes long, which means you're waking up just as the caffeine starts to work its magic. The result: You feel both rested and stimulated.For more energy-boosting tips, sign up for the Health newsletter.There
The experimental treatment considered for baby Charlie Gard

The experimental treatment considered for baby Charlie Gard

Health
The U.S. doctor in London to examine Charlie Gard, an 11-month-old boy suffering from a critical illness that has damaged his brain and rendered him unable to breathe on his own, could recommend an experimental treatment -- one which may or may not improve his outcome. A U.K. judge extended invitations to Dr. Michio Hirano, chief of the division of Neuromuscular disorders and a professor of neurology at Columbia University in New York City, as well as a doctor from the Bambino Gesu hospital in Rome who has not been named, after evidence on a new experimental treatment was presented in court last Thursday. The doctors were each given an "honorary contract" by the Great Ormond Street Hospital to examine the baby, use its facilities, review medical records and speak with his doctors and pa...
7 Gadgets That Prep Produce in No Time

7 Gadgets That Prep Produce in No Time

Health
Tired of wasting precious time slicing, dicing, and carving fruits and veggies every time you’re in the mood for a salad? Stripping down dark leafy greens, picking the tiny leaves out of strawberries, pitting and slicing avocados and mangos—all that prep can get so tiring that you have no energy left to actually cook your meal, and might leave you running for less healthy convenience foods. Forget the drama: try these cool new kitchen tools that will seriously cut your prep time—and your fresh produce.OXO Mango Pitter, $ 13.95; Amazon.comOXO Stainless Steel Ratcheting Pineapple Slicer, $ 19.95; Amazon.comChef’n Strawberry Huller, $ 7.99; Amazon.comMastrad Deco Veggie Slicer, $ 14.95; Amazon.comOXO 3-in-1 Avocado Slicer, $ 8.49; Amazon.comChef’n Looseleaf Kale and Herb Stripper, $ 7.95; Ama
Miami boy's death shows powerful opioid's chilling potential

Miami boy's death shows powerful opioid's chilling potential

Health
A 10-year-old boy from a drug-ridden Miami neighborhood apparently died of a fentanyl overdose last month, becoming one of Florida's littlest victims of the opioid crisis, authorities say. But how he came into contact with the powerful painkiller is a mystery. Fifth-grader Alton Banks died June 23 after a visit to the pool in the city's Overtown section. He began vomiting at home, was found unconscious that evening and was pronounced dead at a hospital. Preliminary toxicology tests showed he had fentanyl in his system, authorities said. "We don't believe he got it at his home," Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle said Tuesday. "It could be as simple as touching it. It could have been a towel at the pool." She added: "We just don't know." The case has underscored how frigh...