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Group urges tougher limits on chemical in soaps, cosmetics

Group urges tougher limits on chemical in soaps, cosmetics

Health
TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 -- The germ-fighting chemical triclosan has got to go, an international coalition of scientists claims.Triclosan is found in thousands of products ranging from soap and cosmetics to toothpaste and common household items.But evidence has shown that antimicrobials like triclosan not only fall short in killing bacteria, but they may also harm human health, the coalition said in urging much stricter limits on use of the chemical.This follows action last year by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban triclosan, triclocarban and 17 other microbial agents from hand soap and body wash sold in the United States because they "are not generally recognized as safe and effective."The FDA's move prompted major manufacturers -- such as Johnson & Johnson and Procter & ...
Veterans with traumatic brain injuries at risk for severe headaches years later

Veterans with traumatic brain injuries at risk for severe headaches years later

Health
TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 -- U.S. veterans who have suffered traumatic brain injuries may struggle with severe headaches years later, a new study finds.The study included 172 vets who served in Afghanistan or Iraq between 2 and 11 years before the study began. Half suffered a traumatic brain injury, or TBI, during deployment; half did not.A TBI is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head that disrupts normal brain function. Besides headache, it can lead to post-traumatic stress, depression and sleep disorders, as well as problems with thinking and muscle control, the researchers explained.The researchers assessed the number of vets with the worst headaches, which were described as "disabling" or "severe." A disabling headache was one so bad the veteran stopped all activity and was bedridden...
Age, cost of treatment among top reasons patients leave hospital early

Age, cost of treatment among top reasons patients leave hospital early

Health
MONDAY, June 19, 2017 -- It's a not uncommon occurrence: Patients discharge themselves from the hospital against their doctor's best advice.Now, new research on over 29 million hospital stays sheds light on which types of patients are most prone to this behavior -- and why.Using 2013 U.S. hospital data, researchers found that younger patients are much more likely than older patients to leave the hospital against the advice of their doctor.In fact, patients aged 65 and older were four times less likely to leave the hospital against medical advice than were adults under 65, according to a team led by Dr. Jashvant Poeran, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.Other factors played a role as well. Regardless of their age, men were more likely to leave the hospital agai...
Poll: Most mothers have been 'mommy-shamed'

Poll: Most mothers have been 'mommy-shamed'

Health
MONDAY, June 19, 2017 -- "You're doing that wrong!"Sound familiar, Moms? It should: A new poll finds that six out of 10 American mothers say they've been criticized for their parenting skills.It's called mommy-shaming, and it goes viral when it happens to the famous. Actress Reese Witherspoon was shamed for giving her toddler cinnamon rolls for breakfast, and model Coco Rocho was judged for giving her baby formula.But a nationwide poll of 475 mothers finds it's a familiar experience for most with kids under age 5 -- and the source of the shaming is most often a woman's own parents.Major areas of criticism include discipline, 70 percent; diet and nutrition, 52 percent; sleep, 46 percent; breast- versus bottle-feeding, 39 percent; safety, 20 percent; and child care, 16 percent."Our findings ...
Prostate cancer blood test 'helps target treatment'

Prostate cancer blood test 'helps target treatment'

Health
Scientists have developed a blood test that could pick out which men with advanced prostate cancer would benefit from a new drug treatment.The test detects cancer DNA in the blood, helping doctors check whether precision drugs are working.Cancer Research UK said the test could "greatly improve survival".But larger studies involving more men needed to take place to confirm if doctors could rely on the test, the charity said.Blood samples from 49 men with advanced prostate cancer were collected by researchers, as part of the phase II clinical trial of a drug called olaparib.This type of precision drug is seen as the future of cancer medicine but because it is a targeted treatment, the drug does not work for everyone.Researchers from The Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS ...