News That Matters

Health

5 Real Women Share What It Was Like Giving Up Alcohol for a Month

5 Real Women Share What It Was Like Giving Up Alcohol for a Month

Health
Until last month, I did not fully understand the effects of alcohol. Sure, I’d experienced a tipsy night out and enjoyed the next day’s lovely hangover. But when I gave up alcohol (one of many rules of the Whole30 program, which I did in January), I gradually became aware of how much things change when you part with your Pinot noir.I definitely experienced health perks: I was able to focus my energy on quality catch-ups over coffee, didn’t have liquor-induced late night cravings, and made it to more morning workout classes than usual. Yet what shocked me was how much my social life shifted over the course of 30 days.RELATED: What's the Lowest Calorie Alcohol? 8 Drinks RankedA friend’s request to meet for a “quick drink” led to my long explanation about my no-alcohol decision
I Just Finished Whole30 and Lived to Tell the Tale—Here’s How I Made It Through

I Just Finished Whole30 and Lived to Tell the Tale—Here’s How I Made It Through

Health
Diets have never interested me. As a teenager, I found it absurd that some of my classmates were so concerned with what they ate. They would talk about the new weight-loss plans they were trying or their pledges to eat more of this and less of that. I listened but stayed silent and ate whatever I pleased.Up until this past January, I was still anti-diet. I tried eating more veggies and lean protein during the week, but I never counted calories or vowed to cut dairy from my life completely, for example, as friends did. Yet after writing an article about actress Busy Philipps' positive experience doing a plan called Whole30, I became intrigued.RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It?Two friends and I discussed the article...
5 Supermarkets Share the Secret Store Policies You Should Be Taking Advantage Of

5 Supermarkets Share the Secret Store Policies You Should Be Taking Advantage Of

Health
Almost every week, you can find me zipping through the aisles of my local Trader Joe's as I look for the healthiest food to pile into my cart.Given the unending crowds that Trader Joe's is famous for, I often whiz right past the new products that the retailer puts out (like those butternut fries). But recently, an employee saw me eyeing some sliced oven-roasted turkey that I hadn't seen before, and he asked if I wanted to try it.I was shocked when he ripped open the package right on the spot and offered me a slice. Then he explained that Trader Joe's customers can actually try most products before buying them. For free. I was floored. This is on a whole other level than those sad samples they plop into paper cups at most stores.Before you go hog-wild: The policy doesn't apply to alcoholic ...
5 All-Natural Sweeteners That Are (Somewhat) Healthier Than Sugar

5 All-Natural Sweeteners That Are (Somewhat) Healthier Than Sugar

Health
Have you noticed just how many foods at your local market are now labeled “natural”? According to a recent Consumer Reports survey, 73% of shoppers seek out labels with this term (despite the fact that there’s no FDA standard to define it). All of this means that artificial sweeteners and high fructose corn syrup are out—and a whole slew of natural alternatives have popped up in their place. Some are old-school favorites, like maple syrup; while others, like coconut sugar, are derived from familiar foods. Here’s the lowdown on five such sweeteners—including what’s unique about each one, and the best ways to use them in your kitchen.Maple syrupMaple syrup is still made the same way it has been for decades: by boiling sap from maple trees. The syrup can then be 
AP count: Nearly 11.8M enroll for Obama health law in 2018

AP count: Nearly 11.8M enroll for Obama health law in 2018

Health
Call it the political equivalent of a death-defying escape: former President Barack Obama's health care law pulled in nearly 11.8 million customers for 2018, despite the Republican campaign to erase it from the books. An Associated Press count found that nationwide enrollment was about 3 percent lower than last year. California, with more than 1.5 million sign-ups, was the last state to report, announcing its numbers on Wednesday. Sixteen states increased their enrollment from last year, according to AP's analysis. Six of those were carried by President Donald Trump in 2016, while 10 went for Democrat Hillary Clinton. However, of the total number of people signed up this year about 6 in 10 live in states that went for Trump, according to the AP's analysis. "If you had asked me a year ago ...