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You Asked: Should I Eat Collagen Powder?

You Asked: Should I Eat Collagen Powder?

Health
Your body produces less and less collagen as you age, so should you supplement it? This article originally appeared on Time.com.The word “collagen” comes from the Greek word for glue, and that’s a helpful way to think about the role collagen plays in your physical health. In your skeleton, tendons, muscles, skin and even your teeth, collagen is a structural protein that binds cells and tissues together while helping them maintain shape and integrity.But your body produces less and less collagen as you age. And some supplement- and food-makers are marketing collagen products as a way to boost your body’s levels of it.“Collagen is basically the sale of amino acids,” says Dr. Mark Moyad, director of preventative and alternative medicine at the University of Michigan
Vaginal mesh operations should be banned, says NICE

Vaginal mesh operations should be banned, says NICE

Health
The health watchdog NICE is to recommend that vaginal mesh operations should be banned from treating organ prolapse in England, the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire show has learned.Draft guidelines from NICE say the implants should only be used for research - and not routine operations.Some implants can cut into the vagina and women have been left in permanent pain, unable to walk, work or have sex.One expert said it is highly likely the NHS will take up the recommendation.However, the organisation is not compelled to act on findings it receives from NICE.Both NHS England and NICE declined to comment.Media playback is unsupported on your device'Life-changing consequences'In the documents - to be published after consultation in December - NICE said there were "serious but well-recognised safety c...
'The seizures have got more frequent and more violent'

'The seizures have got more frequent and more violent'

Health
"It's really frightening. You think 'is she going to be ok or do I have to phone for an ambulance again?'."What's she going to be like when she comes round? It's a daily struggle". Kiley Lay's daughter Katie suffers from epilepsy. The 17-year-old from Essex has had the condition since she was two-years-old. but recently her illness has taken a turn for the worse. "The seizures have got more frequent and more violent. She'll try and scratch herself and pull her hair. She's had 124 seizures since April." 'Not good enough'Katie was having daily seizures in the summer, so her family turned to their GP for help. They were told their daughter could be referred to a neurologist - but there was a waiting list. The earliest she could see a neurologist would be February next year.Kiley says: "We nee...
Digital pills can help doctors monitor opioid abuse

Digital pills can help doctors monitor opioid abuse

Health
Nov. 20 (UPI) -- Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital are testing the use of ingestible sensors to track opioid ingestion patterns.The sensor is planted in a gelatin capsule along with the medication. The digital pills can help doctors track how frequently patients are using their opioid prescription, and potentially alert healthcare officials to signs of abuse.During initial tests, researchers found opioid-naive patients actually took fewer pills over a shorter period of time while managing fracture pain.Researchers published the results of their tests in the journal Anesthesia & Analgesia."As an investigational tool, the digital pill provides a direct measure of opioid ingestion and changes in medication-taking behavior," lead study author Dr. Edward Boyer said in a news relea...
Parasites, infections in N. Korean soldier who defected reveal country's conditions

Parasites, infections in N. Korean soldier who defected reveal country's conditions

Health
Hospital records from a soldier who defected from North Korea this month offer telling details about health problems in the closed country. The 24-year-old soldier had parasitic infections and a dangerous hepatitis infection — conditions that speak to poor sanitation and rough conditions in North Korea. Most shocking, perhaps, are reports of large parasitic worms, some measuring 11 inches, recovered from his intestines. "An estimated 5 million people in North Korea have intestinal roundworms. That's 20 percent of the population," said Dr. Peter Hotez, the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor. Doctors found the parasites — likely Ascaris roundworms — while repairing intestinal damage from multiple bullet wounds the soldier sustained during his escape. The eggs of