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With new supplies, space station astronauts to research mending broken bones

With new supplies, space station astronauts to research mending broken bones

Science
Nov. 21 (UPI) -- New research on the International Space Station will include implantable drug delivery devices and an adhesive that can stimulate bone growth. SpaceX will launch a resupply mission as early as Tuesday to deliver a payload of items developed by commercial companies that need to be tested in orbit. The launch window opens at 3:54 p.m. EST. It will be the 26th commercial resupply service mission by SpaceX and NASA. The Falcon 9 rocket is to be launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The space-based research is sponsored by the ISS National Laboratory. The bone-mending injectable adhesive, called Tetranite, was developed by medical device company RevBio. The adhesive is intended to speed bone growth after breaks and fractures. The research will focus on how Tetran...
COP27: Climate costs deal struck but no fossil fuel progress

COP27: Climate costs deal struck but no fossil fuel progress

Science
This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.By Georgina RannardClimate reporter in Sharm el-SheikhA historic deal has been struck at the UN's COP27 summit that will see rich nations pay poorer countries for the damage and economic losses caused by climate change.It ends almost 30 years of waiting by nations facing huge climate impacts.But developed nations left dissatisfied over progress on cutting fossil fuels."A clear commitment to phase-out all fossil fuels? Not in this text," said the UK's Alok Sharma, who was president of the previous COP summit in Glasgow.This year's talks in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, came close to collapse, and overran by two days.Luke-warm applause met the historic moment the "loss and damage fund" was agreed in the ea...
COP27: Climate anxiety is rising – it might be a good thing

COP27: Climate anxiety is rising – it might be a good thing

Science
Getty ImagesBy Georgina RannardBBC News Climate & ScienceGlobal leaders are about to meet for another UN climate summit - COP27 starting in Sharm el-Sheikh on Sunday - and the reality of climate change for many people can be overwhelming.Record-breaking heatwaves, devastating floods in Pakistan, and drought in East Africa - and that is just this year.It is no surprise that climate anxiety is rising, particularly among young people, who have mostly only known a world affected by climate change.But experts and activists have told BBC News that these fears can actually be good news for the planet."People are who really aware of climate change may be more motivated to take action," University of Bath environmental psychologist Prof Lorraine Whitmarsh says.Her research has found a link betw...
SpaceX launches broadcast satellite to serve Europe, Africa, Middle East

SpaceX launches broadcast satellite to serve Europe, Africa, Middle East

Science
Nov. 3 (UPI) -- SpaceX Thursday put the Hotbird 13G satellite into orbit for Eutelsat to bolster broadcast systems across Europe, Africa and the Middle East. In a statement Eutelsat said, "Once into orbit and positioned, the satellite Eutelsat Hotbird 13G will, with its twin Eutelsat Hotbird 13F launched on Oct. 15, reinforce and enhance the broadcast of more than a thousand television channels into homes across Europe, Northern Africa and the Middle East. Moreover, the two satellites will offer advanced features in terms of uplink signal protection and resilience." The Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched at 1:22 a.m. EST from Cape Canaveral, Florida, according to Eutelsat. Eutelsat's statement said that the satellite "was successfully launched into Geostationary Transfer Orbit." It was...
Climate change: Kilimanjaro’s and Africa’s last glaciers to go by 2050, says UN

Climate change: Kilimanjaro’s and Africa’s last glaciers to go by 2050, says UN

Science
Getty ImagesBy Patrick HughesBBC News Climate and Science Glaciers across the globe - including the last ones in Africa - will be unavoidably lost by 2050 due to climate change, the UN says in a report.Glaciers in a third of UN World Heritage sites will melt within three decades, a UNESCO report found.Mount Kilimanjaro's last glaciers will vanish as will glaciers in the Alps and Yosemite National Park in the US.They will melt regardless of the world's actions to combat climate change, the authors say.Vanishing glaciers threaten Europe's water supplyIce and sled-dogs disappear as Greenland warms upWorld's glaciers melting at a faster paceThe report, which makes projections based on satellite data, comes as world leaders prepare to meet in Egypt for next week's COP27 climate change conferenc...