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Microfibers could allow pieces of clothing to track a variety of vital signs

Microfibers could allow pieces of clothing to track a variety of vital signs

Science
Dec. 1 (UPI) -- New research suggests it won't be long before socks or a wristband are tracking a variety of vital signs, from a person's heart rate and blood pressure to their cholesterol levels and circadian rhythms. According to a paper published Tuesday in the journal Applied Physics Reviews, microfibers and nanofibers will make it possible for pieces of clothing to keep tabs on common ailments, such as diabetes, asthma, obesity and high blood pressure. Advertisement Wearable fibers are both sensitive and flexible, capable of being woven into a variety of garments, or even woven directly into a person's skin -- like a tattoo. These fibers can measure blood pressure, heart rate, sleep quality, cholesterol levels, oxygen levels and other vital signs. As a population ages, health proble...
OneWeb’s satellite plant returns to full-scale production

OneWeb’s satellite plant returns to full-scale production

Science
ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 1 (UPI) -- Florida-based OneWeb Satellites has returned to full-scale production of spacecraft after its big client and part owner, OneWeb, emerged from bankruptcy. The high-tech factory near Kennedy Space Center churns out eight satellites a week, which is the average pace it was on before the bankruptcy, CEO Tony Gingiss said in an interview Friday. Advertisement "We are stronger and leaner as an organization now," Gingiss said. "We hit pause, like many others had to in 2020, due to the pandemic and the OneWeb bankruptcy, but it made us think a lot about our value proposition." The company is leaner because it is operating with less than 200 people, whereas the plant had almost 400 at its peak in early 2020, he said. OneWeb Satellites plans to hire only about 15 to 2...
Recycled concrete could reduce pressure on landfills

Recycled concrete could reduce pressure on landfills

Science
Nov. 30 (UPI) -- In a new study, researchers have confirmed recycled concrete works just as well as concrete, and for some purposes, even better. The findings, published Monday in the journal Construction and Building Materials, could help keep rubble out the landfill. Advertisement For the study, engineers poured recycled cement to lay a building's foundation and a pave a municipal sidewalk. Researchers kept tabs on the material structures over a five year period. Both the foundation and sidewalk proved as strong and durable as similar structures built using traditional cement. "We live in a world where we are constantly in search of sustainable solutions that remove waste from our landfills," lead researcher Shahria Alam said in a news release. "A number of countries around the world h...
Brexit: Ministers unveil next steps in England’s farming policy

Brexit: Ministers unveil next steps in England’s farming policy

Science
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German Entomological Institute names Danish mayfly Insect of the Year

German Entomological Institute names Danish mayfly Insect of the Year

Science
Nov. 27 (UPI) -- The Danish mayfly has been named 2021's Insect of the Year. A board of trustees established by the German Entomological Institute has named an Insect of the Year every year since 1999, with the aim of honoring an insect species that deserves greater fame for its rarity, its ecological value, aesthetic value -- or even its "ordinariness." Advertisement "The Insect of the Year is intended to bring an exemplary species (and insects in general) closer to people," said an announcement from the institute. According to the institute, the Danish mayfly is distinguished by its life cycle: while mayflies famously live just a few days once they reach maturity, their larvae take one to three years to fully develop. During that time, they repeatedly shed their skin and develop visible...