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First CO2 rise in four years puts pressure on Paris targets

First CO2 rise in four years puts pressure on Paris targets

Science
Global emissions of CO2 in 2017 are projected to rise for the first time in four years, dashing hopes that a peak might soon be reached. The main cause of the expected growth has been greater use of coal in China as its economy expanded. Researchers are uncertain if the rise in emissions is a one-off or the start of a new period of CO2 build-up.Scientists say that a global peak in CO2 before 2020 is needed to limit dangerous global warming this century.The Global Carbon Project has been analysing and reporting on the scale of emissions of CO2 since 2006. Carbon output has grown by about 3% per year in that period, but growth essentially declined or remained flat between 2014 and 2016.The latest figures indicate that in 2017, emissions of CO2 from all human activities grew by about 2% globa...
Brexit: Environment watchdog planned says Gove

Brexit: Environment watchdog planned says Gove

Science
A new environment watchdog to protect UK wildlife, land, water and air once Britain leaves the European Union is being planned by the government.Environment Secretary Michael Gove said the body would hold the powerful to account and deliver a green Brexit.The plans come amid concerns that environmental regulations enshrined in EU law could be lost after Brexit.Mr Gove told the Andrew Marr Show standards would not be sacrificed as part of a potential US free trade deal.Wildlife prioritisedMr Gove wants the watchdog to be independent of government - able to speak its mind freely, he said, with clear legal authority.Writing in The Telegraph, he said the watchdog would have "real bite" but did not outline exact planned powers.He said it was important that environmental enforcement and policym...
Venus and Jupiter conjunction: Sky-watchers await dawn display

Venus and Jupiter conjunction: Sky-watchers await dawn display

Science
Jupiter and Venus will be visible to the naked eye close together in the sky before dawn on Monday.The planets will appear in conjunction in the south-east, just above the horizon, and may appear to look like one bright star. In the UK, the best viewing time will be 40 minutes before sunrise.Jupiter's four Galilean moons will also be visible to those with a telescope. Clear skies are needed - and forecast for much of England and Wales.Watch: The dog that orbited the earthThe astronaut who was told she would never go to spaceThe planets will be seen best by those in mid-northern latitudes around the world, including the UK and northern US.Observers will have to have an uninterrupted view to the south-east as the planets will be very low in the sky.You may also like: Let's block ads! (Why?) ...
Rocket launch rescheduled after aircraft enters restricted space

Rocket launch rescheduled after aircraft enters restricted space

Science
Nov. 11 (UPI) -- Orbital OTK rescheduled Saturday's Antares rocket launch after another aircraft flew into restricted airspace near NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.The rocket was expected to carry the Cygnus aircraft into orbit and deliver 7,400 pounds of supplies, equipment and science experiments to the International Space Station.Within 2 minutes of the scheduled launch time of 7:37 a.m., Orbital OTK scrapped the launch saying a "small aircraft" was flying at about 500 feet some 6 miles offshore."We were working no issues until an aircraft flew into restricted airspace," the aerospace company said on Twitter. "We are currently de-tanking and will be ready to go tomorrow morning."Orbital OTK rescheduled the launch for 7:14 a.m. Sunday.Should skies remain clear, it was predicte...
Antarctic base comes out of deep freeze

Antarctic base comes out of deep freeze

Science
The advance party sent in to open up Britain’s mothballed Antarctic base have found no damage. Halley station was closed in March and staff withdrawn because of uncertainty over the behaviour of cracks in the Brunt Ice Shelf - the flowing, floating platform on which it sits. The base was secured and left to the elements, with temperatures dipping down to around -50C. But the first arrivals say Halley is none the worse for its shut-down. The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) flew a party of 12 into the base to start switching all the utilities back on - the power and heating. One fear was that windows might have broken in a storm and that this could have allowed snow to get inside. But that has not been the case. Halley operations manager John Eager said: "The team was very pleased to find th