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Ben Nevis gets automatic weather station

Ben Nevis gets automatic weather station

Science
Live weather data is being recorded again at the top of Ben Nevis, the UK's highest peak, after a 113-year gap. Researchers have installed an automatic meteorological station that digitally collects information on temperatures, wind speeds and rainfall levels.Until 1904, the same measurements were gathered by men who lived in a shelter at the summit.The weather station was carried up the mountain, in the Scottish Highlands, by a team of researchers on Tuesday.The new station means visitors to the UnEarthed exhibition in Edinburgh next week will be able to take a look in real-time at weather conditions on the mountain, something that was not possible previously. Dr Barbara Brooks and her team from the NERC National Centre for Atmospheric Science carried the equipment up the mountain on Tues...
Twice-dead star explodes 50 years later

Twice-dead star explodes 50 years later

Science
Nov. 8 (UPI) -- It's the star that keeps on dying -- astronomers have discovered a star that's exploded several times over the last half-century.Scientists first noted supernova iPTF14hls in September 2014. The fresh explosion seemed like the average type II-P supernova. The glow of such explosions usually last for 100 days. This supernova remained bright for 600 days.When researchers examined archival observations of this specific spot in the sky, they found a 1954 explosion in the very same location.Apparently, the star suffered a fiery near-death explosion, survived, and then exploded again five decades later."This supernova breaks everything we thought we knew about how they work," Iair Arcavi, an astronomer at the University of California Santa Barbara and Las Cumbres Observatory, sai...
Scientists design smart paper capable of detecting water, conducting electricity

Scientists design smart paper capable of detecting water, conducting electricity

Science
Nov. 7 (UPI) -- Scientists at the University of Washington have designed smart paper capable of sensing water and conducting electricity. The paper could be used to detect water leaks in city pipes.Even small leaks in a city's maze of pipes can prove costly. Left alone, the problem can get worse. And finding the leak can prove timely. The American Water Works Association estimate leaks cause 250,000 water line breaks every year, costing public water utilities an annual sum of $ 2.8 billion.Scientists hope their new smart paper can shrink those costs by making it easier to find and fix leaks.The paper can sense the presence of water and conduct an electric current to sound an alarm or trigger a light, alerting maintenance authorities to the presence of a leak."Water sensing is very challeng...
Collision of giant galaxy clusters yields colorful image

Collision of giant galaxy clusters yields colorful image

Science
Nov. 7 (UPI) -- A new image released by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory showcases the intense radio emissions triggered by the collision of several giant galaxy clusters.The cosmic collision triggered shockwaves and released massive amounts of energy, heating up gas and dust across a region of space several million light-years wide.The massive galaxy cluster is named Abell 2744, or Pandora's Cluster. It's located 4 billion light-years from Earth.The newly released image is a composite of observations made by several instruments. Scientists combined new data collected by the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with older data recorded by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory.The renderings of Abell 2744's radio wave and X-ray emissions are overlaid on a visible...
Astronomers observe one of the oldest galaxies in the universe

Astronomers observe one of the oldest galaxies in the universe

Science
Nov. 6 (UPI) -- Astronomers have observed the second most distant dust-filled, star-forming galaxy in the cosmos. The galaxy was spotted using the Large Millimeter Telescope, the most powerful telescope of its kind.The LMT is positioned at the top of Sierra Negra, the fifth tallest peak in Mexico, and jointly operated by the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and Mexico's National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics.The newly imaged galaxy was likely one of the earliest star-forming galaxies in the universe."The Big Bang happened 13.7 billion years ago, and now we are seeing this galaxy from 12.8 billion years ago, so it was forming within the first billion years after the Big Bang," Amherst astrophysicist Min Yun said in a news release. "Seeing an object within the first b...