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Study: People favor products with more reviews, regardless of what reviews say

Study: People favor products with more reviews, regardless of what reviews say

Science
Aug. 21 (UPI) -- New research suggests that consumers use reviews and ratings by other consumers to drive their purchasing decision-making.The study, published today in Psychological Science, found that people favor products that have more reviews, even if they have lower ratings than an alternative product."It's extremely common for websites and apps to display the average score of a product along with the number of reviews. Our research suggests that, in some cases, people might take this information and make systematically bad decisions with it," Derek Powell, a researcher at Stanford University, said in a press release."We found that people were biased toward choosing to purchase more popular products and that this sometimes led them to make very poor decisions."Researchers studied act...
Solar eclipse 2017: Americans gaze at sky spectacular

Solar eclipse 2017: Americans gaze at sky spectacular

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceA total solar eclipse has wowed the US.A huge shadow cast by the Moon as it passed in front of the Sun swept across the nation, from Oregon in the west to South Carolina in the east.Millions of people moved to get into the path of darkness, putting on their protective glasses to gaze at the sky in wonder.It was the first total solar eclipse visible from America's lower 48 states in 38 years, and the first since 1918 to track from coast to coast.The spectacle got under way in earnest in Oregon at 10:16 local time (17:16 GMT; 18:16 BST).Skywatchers gathered at coastal beaches and towns witnessed the Sun's disc being completely obscured by the Moon for two minutes.But just before and just after "totality", they also got to see some of the classic fe...
How to watch the solar eclipse move across America

How to watch the solar eclipse move across America

Science
Aug. 17 (UPI) -- Monday's total solar eclipse is expected to break records, with about 220 million people expected to watch.Some believe the event will inspire the largest temporary migration in human history. With camera-equiped smartphones now ubiquitous, it's also likely to become the most documented event ever.When and whereThe moon's shadow will make landfall in Depoe Bay, Ore., at 10:17 a.m. PDT. The eclipse will move west and south across the United States, tracing what's called the path of totality. By 2:47 p.m. EDT, the moon's shadow will move across Charleston, S.C., and out into the Atlantic Ocean.The shadow's trip across the country will last just 90 minutes. The path will intersect 14 states, including Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Illinois...
To teach kids morals, read books with humans not animals

To teach kids morals, read books with humans not animals

Science
Aug. 18 (UPI) -- Anthropomorphic, or human-like, animals are often the protagonists of children's books. But new research suggests parents who want their kids to pick up on a story's moral lessons should choose books featuring humans, not animals.Researchers in Canada found four to six-year-olds were more likely to share with their peers after being read a story with human characters."Many people believe children find stories with human-like animals captivating and relatable, but what we're finding is that this is not the case," Dr. Patricia Ganea, associate professor of early cognitive development at the University of Toronto, said in a news release. "Overall, children were more likely to act on the moral of the story when it featured a human character."Researchers read stories about shar...
Archaeologists discover ancient trade routes in Vietnam

Archaeologists discover ancient trade routes in Vietnam

Science
Aug. 18 (UPI) -- Archaeologists have discovered an ancient trade network crisscrossing Vietnam's Mekong Delta region.As revealed by several excavations, a vast network of manufacturing hubs and trade routes moved large amounts of goods from settlement to settlement between 4,500 and 3,000 years ago."We knew some artefacts were being moved around but this shows evidence for a major trade network that also included specialist tool-makers and technological knowledge. It's a whole different ball game," Catherine Frieman, an archaeologist at the Australian National University, said in a news release. "This isn't a case of people producing a couple of extra items on top of what they need. It's a major operation."The network's discovery was made possible by the excavation of several stone tools a...