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Prof Stephen Hawking funeral: Legacy 'will live forever'

Prof Stephen Hawking funeral: Legacy 'will live forever'

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceThe legacy of Prof Stephen Hawking will live forever, mourners at the theoretical physicist's funeral heard.Prof Hawking, who had motor neurone disease, died on 14 March, aged 76, at his home in Cambridge.Actor Eddie Redmayne was one of several speakers at a service at the university church, Great St Mary's.The professor's eldest son Robert, former student Prof Fay Dowker and Astronomer Royal Martin Rees also gave addresses to the congregation.As the funeral cortege arrived at the church, the bell rang out 76 times - once for each year of Prof Hawking's life.His close family, including his three children Lucy, Robert and Tim, followed behind the hearse carrying the professor's coffin.As it pulled up, the vehicle was met with applause from the hun...
Shipping faces demands to cut CO2

Shipping faces demands to cut CO2

Science
A battle is under way to force the global shipping industry to play its part in tackling climate change. A meeting of the International Maritime Organisation in London next week will face demands for shipping to radically reduce its CO2 emissions.If shipping doesn't clean up, it could contribute almost a fifth of the global total of CO2 by 2050.A group of nations led by Brazil, Saudi Arabia, India, Panama and Argentina is resisting CO2 targets for shipping.Their submission to the meeting says capping ships' overall emissions would restrict world trade. It might also force goods on to less efficient forms of transport.This argument is dismissed by other countries which believe shipping could actually benefit from a shift towards cleaner technology.The UK's Shipping Minister Nusrat Ghani tol...
Where Chinese space station Tiangong falls to Earth still a mystery

Where Chinese space station Tiangong falls to Earth still a mystery

Science
March 30 (UPI) -- The best guess of expert astronomers and space junk-trackers is that China's decommissioned, out-of-control space station, Tiangong-1, will reenter Earth's atmosphere anywhere between late Friday night and Sunday.In the words of the European Space Station: "This is highly variable."What is clear, is that it's very hard to track pieces of space junk like Tiangong."There are many factors acting on an object as it decays and reenters the atmosphere," Maj. Cody Chiles, spokesperson for the Joint Force Space Component Command, told UPI. "These factors include how it tumbles and breaks up, variations in the gravitational field of a landmass or ocean, solar radiation pressure and atmospheric drag.""These factors complicate our ability to predict what happens after reentry occurs...
Earth's water present before impact formed moon, study finds

Earth's water present before impact formed moon, study finds

Science
March 29 (UPI) -- Based on an extensive collection of lunar and terrestrial samples, researchers have determined that most of the water on Earth was already present at the time of the impact that created the moon.Scientists from the United States, Britain and France studied moon rocks brought back to Earth by astronauts on the six Apollo missions and volcanic rocks retrieved from the ocean floor by Earth-bound scientists. They published their findings Thursday in the journal Science Advances."The research discovered only a small difference in oxygen composition between the lunar and terrestrial rocks," Dr. Richard Greenwood, a research fellow at The New University in England and lead author of the new study, said in a press release. "This demonstrates how well mixed all of the pieces of ro...
Scientists explain the sound of knuckle cracking

Scientists explain the sound of knuckle cracking

Science
Scientists have turned their attention to investigating that most annoying of human habits - the sound made when you crack your knuckles.The characteristic pop can be explained by three mathematical equations, say researchers in the US and France.Their model confirms the idea that the cracking sound is due to tiny bubbles collapsing in the fluid of the joint as the pressure changes.Surprisingly, perhaps, the phenomenon has been debated for around a century.Science student Vineeth Chandran Suja was cracking his knuckles in class in France when he decided to investigate. He developed a series of equations with his lecturer, Dr Abdul Barakat of École polytechnique, to explain the typical sound that accompanies the release of the joint between the fingers and the hand bones."The first equation