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Sir David Attenborough launches 'Boaty' polar ship

Sir David Attenborough launches 'Boaty' polar ship

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your device Sir David Attenborough has launched the 10,000-tonne hull of the UK's newest polar ship - named after him - into the River Mersey.The broadcaster pushed the button, sending the hull sliding out from the Cammell Laird yard in Birkenhead, into the water where building will continue."Our future will be affected by what people working on this ship will be discovering in years to come," he said.It is "the greatest possible honour" to be its namesake, Sir David added.The hull of the £200m research vessel entered the river stern-first, creating a big wave as it hit the water.Ahead of the launch, the riverbed was dredged in front of the slipway to make sure the steel mass did not bottom out. ...
Researchers isolate ancient parvovirus from human remains

Researchers isolate ancient parvovirus from human remains

Science
July 13 (UPI) -- Scientists have isolated an ancient sample of the parvovirus from human remains, which could provide researchers with detailed knowledge of extinct genetic diversity and viral phylodynamics. An international collaborative of researchers recently reported their analysis of ancient human parvovirus samples taken from the dental and skeletal remains of 1,578 people who lived between 500 and 6,900 years ago. They published the findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Airborne and bloodborne human parvovirus B19 is responsible for multiple illnesses, including the childhood rash known as fifth disease, chronic anemia in AIDS patients, arthritis in the elderly, aplastic crisis in people with bone marrow-related illness and hydrops fetalis in pregnant wo...
Source of cosmic 'ghost' particle revealed

Source of cosmic 'ghost' particle revealed

Science
Ghost-like particles known as neutrinos have been puzzling scientists for decades.Part of the family of fundamental particles that make up all known matter, neutrinos hurtle unimpeded through the Universe, interacting with almost nothing. The majority shoot right through the Earth as though it isn't even there, making them exceptionally difficult to detect and study.Despite this, researchers have worked out that many are created by the Sun and even in our own atmosphere. But the source of one high energy group, known as cosmic neutrinos, has remained particularly elusive.Now, in the first discovery of its kind, it turns out that a distant galaxy powered by a supermassive black hole may be shooting a beam of these cosmic neutrinos...
Iceman's last meal was high-fat, high-calorie feast

Iceman's last meal was high-fat, high-calorie feast

Science
Goat's fat and wild venison, plus sides of ancient wheat and bracken.It's not a menu likely to appear on Masterchef, but for some of our ancestors it was a nutritious feast.Scientists have revealed that the last supper of Oetzi the Iceman was well-balanced but also alarmingly high in fat.The man lived 5,300 years ago and met his death on a frozen glacier. His body was preserved in the ice for millennia until it was discovered in 1991.Scientists have been able to find out about many aspects of his life, including what he ate before he died.They say he filled his stomach with fat from wild goat, meat from red deer, an ancient grain known as einkorn and toxic fern.Source of cosmic 'ghost' particle revealedIceland accused of killing ...
Hubble, Gaia produce most precise measure of universe's expansion rate

Hubble, Gaia produce most precise measure of universe's expansion rate

Science
July 12 (UPI) -- By combining the observations of the two most powerful space telescopes in orbit, scientists have achieved the most precise measurement of the Hubble constant, the universe's expansion rate. The new measurement confirms the tension between explosion rate in the early and late universe, researchers report. Astronomers can measure the expansion of the universe by measuring a galaxy's redshift, a change in the wavelength of the light due to a change in the velocity of the object. By measuring the redshift of galaxies using the Hubble Telescope, scientists have established the Hubble constant. But investigations of the cosmic microwave background, the oldest radiation in the universe, can also be used to predict the universe's expansion rate. Maps of the microwave signature ...