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Bank of England criticised for financing carbon-intensive firms

Bank of England criticised for financing carbon-intensive firms

Science
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Climate change: Six questions about the Cumbria coal controversy

Climate change: Six questions about the Cumbria coal controversy

Science
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Tiny particles formed from trace gases can seed open ocean clouds

Tiny particles formed from trace gases can seed open ocean clouds

Science
Jan. 22 (UPI) -- It doesn't take much to seed a cloud in the atmosphere above the open ocean, according to a new study published Friday in the journal Nature Communications. When sunlight reacts with trace gas molecules in the marine boundary layer, the half-a-mile-thick layer of atmosphere that sits above the open ocean, tiny aerosols are forged -- a process called new particle formation. Advertisement "When we say 'new particle formation,' we're talking about individual gas molecules, sometimes just a few atoms in size, reacting with sunlight," study co-author Chongai Kuang said in a news release. "It's interesting to think about how something of that scale can have such an impact on our climate -- on how much energy gets reflected or trapped in our atmosphere," said Kuang, a climate sc...
New light shed on Charles Darwin’s ‘abominable mystery’

New light shed on Charles Darwin’s ‘abominable mystery’

Science
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A quarter of known bee species haven’t been seen in more than 20 years

A quarter of known bee species haven’t been seen in more than 20 years

Science
Jan. 22 (UPI) -- There's never been more data on the world's animal and plant populations, but despite the proliferation of public records on species abundance, many known bee species have disappeared from datasets. According to a new survey, published Friday in the journal One Earth, roughly a quarter of known bee species haven't made an appearance in public records in more than 20 years. Advertisement "With citizen science and the ability to share data, records are going up exponentially, but the number of species reported in these records is going down," first author Eduardo Zattara, biologist at the Pollination Ecology Group from the Institute for Research on Biodiversity and the Environment, said in a news release. Disappearance from the scientific record isn't proof of extinction. M...