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Meteorite diamonds 'came from lost planet'

Meteorite diamonds 'came from lost planet'

Science
A diamond-bearing space rock that exploded in Earth's atmosphere in 2008 was part of a lost planet from the early Solar System, a study suggests.The parent "proto-planet" would have existed billions of years ago before breaking up in a collision and was about as large as Mercury or Mars.A team has published their results in the journal Nature Communications.They argue that the pressures necessary to produce diamonds of this kind could only occur in planet of this size.Using three different types of microscopy, the researchers characterised the mineral and chemical make-up of the diamond-bearing rocks left scattered in the Nubian desert of northern Sudan after the asteroid 2008 TC3 hit the atmosphere.Some of the material trapped in the diamond since formation (features known as inclusions) ...
Study details meteorite diamonds from a lost planet

Study details meteorite diamonds from a lost planet

Science
April 17 (UPI) -- New analysis of a slice of a meteorite containing unusual diamonds suggest the space rock came from a long lost planet.In 2008, an asteroid measuring 13 feet across penetrated Earth's atmosphere and exploded above Sudan, scattering rocky fragments across the Nubian Desert. The fragments were gathered and organized into the Almahata Sitta collection.The Almahata Sitta fragments are ureilites, a kind of rocky meteorite containing clusters of tiny diamonds. Scientists believe ureilite diamonds can form three ways: under the extreme pressure triggered by a planetary collision, through chemical vapor deposition or under normal pressure conditions inside the parent body -- as most diamonds on Earth are formed.Over the last decades, several teams of researchers have studied the ...
Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Miniature human brain implants survive, grow inside mice for months

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- Miniature human brains, or human brain organoids, can survive and grow after being implanted in the skulls of mice. It's the first time human cerebral organoids have been installed inside another species.Researchers describe the breakthrough in a new paper published Monday in the journal Nature Biotechnology.Scientists grew the pea-sized brains from stem cells and then placed them inside the skulls of mice. Researchers removed a small amount of tissue to make room for the miniature brains. Tiny, transparent windows in the skulls of the test mice allowed scientists to keep tabs on the brain implants -- the organoids were also designed to express a green fluorescent protein, causing them to glow inside the mice skulls.Roughly 80 percent of the implants were successfully rec...
Rising temperatures enabled peatland formation at the end of the last ice age

Rising temperatures enabled peatland formation at the end of the last ice age

Science
April 16 (UPI) -- New research suggests periods of global warming during the last ice age encouraged the formation of peatlands.Researchers began by designing a computer model to simulate local climate patterns during the last 26,000 years. The last ice age reached its glacial maximum between 26,000 and 22,000 years ago, after which glaciers began to retreat.Scientists also created a timeline of peatland formation using radiocarbon dating peat samples collected in North America, northern Europe and Patagonia. When they compared their timeline with their model's simulations, they found higher local summer temperatures, not increased rainfall, accurately predicted peatland formation."This work helps explain the genesis of one of the world's most important ecosystem types and its potentially ...
Hubble captures glow of giant galaxy cluster

Hubble captures glow of giant galaxy cluster

Science
April 13 (UPI) -- A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope showcases a massive galaxy cluster, a web of thousands of galaxies tied together by the tug of gravity.The galaxy cluster featured in the image is named PLCK G308.3-20.2. Like an ecosystem full of biodiversity, the cluster is home to wide range of galaxies -- all different types, shapes and sizes.This particular galaxy cluster is situated 5 billion light-years away from Earth.As recently as a few decades ago, astronomers thought galaxy clusters were the largest structures in the universe, but in the 1980s, scientists realized galaxy clusters were organized into structures called superclusters.Superclusters are made of groups of clusters that can stretch hundreds of millions of light-years across. Some superclusters cover as much...