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Endangered Bolivian frog gets dating profile just in time for Valentine's Day

Endangered Bolivian frog gets dating profile just in time for Valentine's Day

Science
Feb. 14 (UPI) -- Romeo, Bolivia's last known Sehuencas water frog, has been calling unsuccessfully for a mate for nine years.To draw attention to Romeo and the plight of his species, scientists have created Romeo an online dating profile -- just in time for Valentine's Day.The idea may be cute, but the content is serious."Not to start this off super heavy or anything, but I'm literally the last of my species," reads Romeo's Match.com profile.Scientists at the Global Wildlife Conservation and the Bolivian Amphibian Initiative created Romeo's profile with the help Match, the world's most popular relationship site.[embedded content]"When biologists collected Romeo 10 years ago, we knew the Sehuencas water frog, like other amphibians in Bolivia, was in trouble, but we had no idea we wouldn't b...
95 new exoplanets discovered during NASA's K2 mission

95 new exoplanets discovered during NASA's K2 mission

Science
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Scientists have confirmed 95 additional exoplanets outside the solar system based on analysis of NASA's K2 mission data.Since the first planet orbiting a star similar to the solar system's sun was detected in 1995, more than 3,300 exoplanets -- ranging from rocky Earth-sized planets to large gas giants like Jupiter -- have been found.The first data from the K2 was released in 2014, with the latest findings released in a paper published in the Astronomical Journal."We started out analyzing 275 candidates of which 149 were validated as real exoplanets. In turn 95 of these planets have proved to be new discoveries," Andrew Mayo, a doctoral student at the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark, said in a press release.The work also involved colleagues ...
UK air pollutants continue decline

UK air pollutants continue decline

Science
Total emissions from motor vehicles fell 12% from 2012 to 2016, according to the Office for National Statistics.However, the UK remains in breach of European limits for nitrogen oxides (NOx) in 16 cities.Nonetheless, environmentalists have welcomed the overall drop in pollutants from cars and lorries. The reduction is thought to have been propelled by tightening restrictions.The one emission going in the wrong direction is ammonia from farming. Jon Bennett from the green group ClientEarth told BBC News: “We very much welcome the reduction in emissions."But the concentrations of NO₂ (nitrogen dioxide) in towns and cities are at illegal and harmful levels.“So government policy needs to focus on bringing these down with clean air zones, diesel-scrappage and other initiatives.”The news is cont
Crypto-currency craze 'hinders search for alien life'

Crypto-currency craze 'hinders search for alien life'

Science
Scientists listening out for broadcasts by extra-terrestrials are struggling to get the computer hardware they need, thanks to the crypto-currency mining craze, a radio-astronomer has said.Seti (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) researchers want to expand operations at two observatories.However, they have found that key computer chips are in short supply."We'd like to use the latest GPUs [graphics processing units]... and we can't get 'em," said Dan Werthimer.Demand for GPUs has soared recently thanks to crypto-currency mining."That's limiting our search for extra-terrestrials, to try to answer the question, 'Are we alone? Is there anybody out there?'," Dr Werthimer told the BBC."This is a new problem, it's only happened on orders we've been trying to make in the last couple of mon...
Quantum computers 'one step closer'

Quantum computers 'one step closer'

Science
Quantum computing has taken a step forward with the development of a programmable quantum processor made with silicon.The team used microwave energy to align two electron particles suspended in silicon, then used them to perform a set of test calculations.By using silicon, the scientists hope that quantum computers will be more easy to control and manufacture. The research was published in the journal Nature.The old adage of Schrödinger's Cat is often used to frame a basic concept of quantum theory. We use it to explain the peculiar, but important, concept of superposition; where something can exist in multiple states at once.For Schrodinger's feline friend - the simultaneous states were dead and alive.Superposition is what makes quantum computing so potentially powerful.Standard computer