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Watched chimps change their hunting habits

Watched chimps change their hunting habits

Science
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceChimpanzees in Uganda may have changed their hunting strategy in response to being watched by scientists.While studying the animals, researchers documented very different hunting habits of two closely neighbouring chimp "tribes"."Sonso" chimps hunt in small groups for colobus monkeys, while those from the "Waibira" troop hunt solo and catch "whatever they can get their hands on".The findings show how sensitive chimp society is to human presence. They are published in the journal PLoS One, Biologists who have followed and studied these animals for years think that work may have disturbed the group hunting that seems key to chasing and catching colobus monkeys. Lead researcher Dr Catherine Hobaiter, from the University of St Andrews, said the Waibi...
Spinal disk cells in zebrafish can self-repair

Spinal disk cells in zebrafish can self-repair

Science
June 22 (UPI) -- The cells that make up the developing backbone of zebrafish can self-repair, new research shows. Unfortunately these cells disappear as the backbone matures.Before developing a backbone, embryonic and newly hatched zebrafish are supported by a notochord -- a proto-spine. The soft spine structure is similar to a water-filled garden hose. A shell of epithelial cells protects fluid-filled cells called vacuolated cells.Previous studies suggest tiny sacs in the membranes of vacuolated cells, called caveolae, prevent the fluid cells from popping as the young fish begin swimming.Researchers engineered zebrafish to be without caveolae, to see whether the tiny sacs are essential to spinal chord health and development."In the caveolar mutants, you see these serial lesions up and dow...
New research suggests problematic memories could be deleted

New research suggests problematic memories could be deleted

Science
June 22 (UPI) -- In a series of experiments, neuroscientists were able to selectively delete different types of memories stored a single neuron belonging to a marine snail.The feat, detailed in the journal Current Biology, suggests problematic memories -- like those responsible for PSTD and anxiety -- in the human brain could be excised without harming other memories.When the brain stores a traumatic experience in its memory bank, the memory is actually stored in multiple forms. Each memory can include bits of incidental information from the experience. Years later, these incidental, or neutral, memories can trigger panic attacks and severe anxiety."The example I like to give is, if you are walking in a high-crime area and you take a shortcut through a dark alley and get mugged, and then y...

Scientists 3D-print graphene foam, a first

Science
June 21 (UPI) -- A team of researchers from Texas and China have managed to create graphene foam using a 3D printer. The production method could eventually yield commercial quantities of the material.Graphene's benefits have been well-documented by material scientists. The atomically thin carbon sheets are exceptionally strong, flexible and conductive. But producing graphene in bulk has proven difficult, limiting its potential use in commercial technologies -- whether they be medical implants or smartphones.Scientists at Rice University and China's Tianjin University, however, have found a way to turn nongraphene starting materials into graphene foam using a 3D printer. Researchers detailed their breakthrough in the journal journal ACS Nano."This study is a first of its kind," Rice chemist...

Mars Orbiter spots rover ascending Mount Sharp

Science
June 21 (UPI) -- In an image captured by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Martian rover Curiosity can been seen as a bright blue speck ascending the rocky terrain of Mount Sharp.The image was taken by the orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on June 5 and shared online this week.Curiosity spent the end of last month and early June exploring active sand dunes among the mountain's lower elevations. In the newly released image, the rover can been seen en route to Vera Rubin Ridge.Once at Vera Rubin Ridge, the rover will investigate rock outcrops where the signature of hematite, a type of iron oxide, has been identified by the infrared spectrometers during previous Martian probe missions.On August 5, Curiosity will celebrate the five-year anniversary of its landin...