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GDPR: US news sites blocked to EU users over data protection rules

GDPR: US news sites blocked to EU users over data protection rules

Technology
A number of high-profile US news websites are temporarily unavailable in Europe after new European Union rules on data protection came into effect.The Chicago Tribune and LA Times were among those posting messages saying they were currently unavailable in most European countries.The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) gives EU citizens more rights over how their information is used.The measure is an effort by EU lawmakers to limit tech firms' powers. Under the rules, companies working in the EU - or any association or club in the bloc - must get express consent to collect personal information, or face hefty fines.What sites are unavailable?News sites within the Tronc and Lee Enterprises media publishing groups were affected...
Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Another email about privacy and data? Here's why

Technology
"Updates to our privacy policy", "Stay connected", "Data law changes": You have probably had lots of these emails recently from various companies and organisations - but what's it all about? It's to do with a huge shake-up of data protection laws, with a tougher European standard soon kicking in and companies worried about the potential for huge fines.The EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) means many groups who currently send you emails need to confirm you consent to them using your personal details.For example, if you are still okay to receive marketing information and promotions.It means consent can no longer be assumed. Pre-ticked boxes that you have to uncheck are now banned; as is hiding consent in the middle of long chunks of legal text.Some companies who ...
Google 'stole my videos', says film-maker Philip Bloom

Google 'stole my videos', says film-maker Philip Bloom

Technology
Google has enraged a leading film-maker by using his footage in a corporate video that later leaked online.The technology company used material from more than half a dozen of Philip Bloom's films to make a provocative presentation about ways it could exploit users' data in the future.Mr Bloom makes a living from selling rights to his footage, among other activities.Google insisted that it took copyright law seriously.It said that the "thought-experiment" video had been intended to be seen by only a handful of people. It was made in 2016 by the head of design at X, Google's research and development division.Google added that the executive had now been reminded about its strict copyright rules. ...
New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

New US weather satellite can't keep cool, could hurt photos

Technology
The nation's newest weather satellite, launched less than three months ago, has a serious cooling problem that could affect the quality of its pictures. The trouble is with the GOES-17 satellite's premier instrument for taking images of hurricanes, wildfires, volcanic eruptions and other natural calamities, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The imager's infrared sensors aren't getting properly cooled. Experts are scrambling to understand what went wrong and how to fix it. Officials expect it will take at least a few months to figure out. "As you can imagine, doing this remotely from 22,000 miles below only looking at the on-orbit data is a challenge," said Steve Volz, head of NOAA's satellite and information service. NOAA stresses that three other GOES s...
Zuckerberg's European Parliament testimony criticised

Zuckerberg's European Parliament testimony criticised

Technology
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg has apologised to EU lawmakers for the company's role in the Cambridge Analytica scandal and for allowing fake news to proliferate on its platform.Mr Zuckerberg apologised for Facebook's tools being used "for harm".But his testimony did not please all MEPs at the meeting, some of whom felt he had dodged their questions.One leading UK politician later said the session at the European Parliament had been a "missed opportunity"."Unfortunately the format of questioning allowed Mr Zuckerberg to cherry-pick his responses and not respond to each individual point," said Damian Collins, chair of the UK Parliament's Digital Culture Media and Sport Committee.The format was very different from that of Mr Zuck...