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App that cancels subscriptions launches in UK

App that cancels subscriptions launches in UK

Technology
A service which automatically cancels subscriptions at the end of the free trial period has launched in the UK.It was developed by Josh Browder, who as a teenager developed an algorithm called Do Not Pay, which continues to successfully fight parking fines. His new app, Free Trial Surfing, is not linked to a customer's bank account or credit card, but Mr Browder says it is in partnership with a major bank.However, he declined to say which bank was supporting the venture."The idea for this product came when I realised I was being charged for a $ 21.99 (£18) gym membership from over a year ago that I was never using," he said. "In fact, I had completely forgotten that I had signed up for a free trial in the first place. Constantly
Facebook removes altered Conservative advertisement

Facebook removes altered Conservative advertisement

Technology
Facebook has removed a Conservative Party advert which misrepresented a BBC News story.The ad carried a BBC logo and headline saying "£14 billion pound cash boost for schools" - despite the story it linked to putting the figure at £7.1bn.The social media giant say the Tories had "misused" its advertising platform and it was working to stop headlines being changed in this way. The party has said it is reviewing the way its Facebook adverts are produced.The advert started running on 2 September following a government announcement on new funding for primary and secondary schools in England. Who will regulate digital political ads? Tory Facebook advert altered BBC headline Clicking on the ad took readers to a story on the BBC News website by Sean Coughlan, w
Robotic surgeons set to spark ‘revolution in healthcare’

Robotic surgeons set to spark ‘revolution in healthcare’

Technology
By Noel Phillips, Sky News reporter Surgeons operating on patients while controlling robotic arms could become a new norm in hospitals.The assistance of robots in surgical rooms are predicted to transform the way operations are performed by allowing surgeries to be carried out as keyhole procedures. As the use of robotic surgery becomes more popular, an increasing number of medics are being trained in how to use them. They allow doctors to perform complex techniques using a minimally invasive approach.Consultant colorectal surgeon Jonathan Morton is among a handful of physicians who have tried out the machinery. Image: Surgeon Jonathan Morton is among those who have tried out the technol...
The hobbyists competing to make AI human

The hobbyists competing to make AI human

Technology
This weekend Steve Worswick will be pushing the boundaries of what it is to be human, attempting to fool a panel of judges into thinking they are chatting to another person while really they will be talking to a chatbot.But Steve isn't an engineer at Apple or Amazon, he is a designer from Leeds and the AI he is hoping will pass the test - Mitsuku - is one you have probably never heard of.The competition he is taking part in, the Loebner Prize, is one of the only real-world Turing Tests but is also relatively obscure in the highly-hyped world of artificial intelligence - and not without controversy.This year could be the last time Steve competes - the sponsor Hugh Loebner, a millionaire inventor who made his fortune from brass fit...
Asteroid twice the size of the Shard to pass by Earth

Asteroid twice the size of the Shard to pass by Earth

Technology
An asteroid double the size of the Shard will pass by Earth on Saturday night, NASA scientists have said.    The space rock, known as Asteroid 2000 QW7, is set to fly by around three million miles from Earth at 14,361mph, according to the US space agency's jet propulsion laboratory. The asteroid is approximately between 300 and 600 metres wide, according to NASA data, but it poses no danger.In comparison, the Shard, the tallest building in the UK, stands at 309.7 metres high.The 2000 QW7 will be the second of two relatively medium-sized asteroids to pass Earth in a day. Advertisement The other asteroid, 2010 CO1, is somewhat smaller, being between 120 and 260 metres, and was due to pass Earth earl...