News That Matters

Technology

Ford to boost investment in electric cars by 2022

Ford to boost investment in electric cars by 2022

Technology
Ford says it will boost its investment in electric vehicles to $ 11bn (£8bn) in the next five years, more than doubling a previous commitment. Chairman Bill Ford said the car maker would have 40 hybrid and fully electric vehicles in its range by 2022.It comes as countries around the world put more pressure on car makers to rein in carbon emissions.General Motors, Toyota and Volkswagen have already outlined ambitious plans to offer more electric vehicles. Speaking at the Detroit Auto Show on Sunday, Mr Ford said the focus would be on electrifying existing Ford models without naming any specific cars. He said the firm would offer 16 fully electric vehicles by 2022 and 24 plug-in hybrids. Mr Ford told reporters: "We're all in on this and we're taking our mainstream vehicles, our most iconic v
Phone embeds fingerprint sensor within screen

Phone embeds fingerprint sensor within screen

Technology
Smartphones may soon have fingerprint sensors embedded within screens, thanks to new technological advancements.A prototype of the first ever phone with a scanner within the display was revealed at this year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.Rather than being developed by Apple or Samsung, the world-first was manufactured by Chinese technology company Vivo, which is little known in Western markets.As reviewed by technology publication 9to5Google, the in-display sensor is a lot slower than those previously seen in smartphones, but is just as accurate."In our hands-on demo of the product, the functionality was pretty much flawless," said 9to5Google."Clearly, this technology is still in its early days, but it's an impressive start nonetheless."Hopefully, we'll see this tech debut on mo...
France vs. fake news offers test case for democratic dilemma

France vs. fake news offers test case for democratic dilemma

Technology
Can a democratic country outlaw fake news? France is about to find out, after President Emmanuel Macron ordered a law to quash false information disseminated around electoral campaigns. Criticism is pouring in from media advocates, tech experts — and Kremlin-backed broadcaster RT. They say the law smacks of authoritarianism, would be impossible to enforce and is sure to backfire. Macron's stance "could be just the beginning of actually censoring freedom of speech. We believe it is a very dangerous situation," Xenia Fedorova, director of RT's newly launched French-language channel, told The Associated Press. Yet in a world where a falsehood can reach billions instantaneously and political manipulation is increasingly sophisticated, Macron argues something must be done. A congressional repo