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FCC stonewalling probe of 'massive' fake net neutrality comments scheme: NY AG

FCC stonewalling probe of 'massive' fake net neutrality comments scheme: NY AG

Technology
New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman released an open letter to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai, accusing the agency of stonewalling his office's investigation into what he called a "massive scheme" to inundate the FCC's public net neutrality review process with fake comments. "The process the FCC has employed to consider potentially sweeping alterations to current net neutrality rules has been corrupted by the fraudulent use of Americans’ identities and the FCC has been unwilling to assist my office in our efforts to investigate this unlawful activity," Schneiderman wrote to Pai, a Republican appointed to head the agency by President Donald Trump. Net neutrality rules prevent internet service providers like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast and others from charging
Elon Musk takes 1st steps to build futuristic underground tunnel in LA

Elon Musk takes 1st steps to build futuristic underground tunnel in LA

Technology
It could all be a pipe dream. Elon Musk has filed a permit to dig a tunnel within Los Angeles city limits that would alleviate the standstill traffic the City of Angels is famous for. Last week, The Boring Company, the firm Musk created to build the tunnel, filed an application with city officials to start digging within city limits, the Los Angeles Times reported. Musk tweeted a photo of the first stage of the project near his office in Hawthorne, in southwestern Los Angeles County near Los Angeles International Airport, on Oct. 28. The the initial proposed route would stretch along Interstate 405 from Hawthorne to Westwood, and the project will be funded entirely by private money, a spokesperson for The Boring Co. said Tuesday, according to the Times. Last month, Musk expressed hope...
Uber bins security chief over hack cover-up

Uber bins security chief over hack cover-up

Technology
Uber has got rid of its chief security officer and announced that his team paid off hackers who stole data belonging to 57 million users.The ride-hailing app's chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said: "None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it."Former CSO, Joe Sullivan, presided over a loss of the names, email addresses and mobile phone numbers belonging to Uber drivers and passengers, according to Bloomberg.Mr Sullivan's team then paid the hackers $ 100,000 to delete the data instead of notifying the victims.Uber's former chief executive, Travis Kalanick, learned of the hack in 2016, according to Bloomberg - seven months before a shareholder revolt forced him to quit and replaced him with Mr Khosrowshahi."At the time of the incident, we took immediate steps to...
Brexit sending UK space firms out of orbit

Brexit sending UK space firms out of orbit

Technology
UK companies are already starting to lose out on European space contracts as a result of Brexit, MPs have heard.Simon Henley, president-elect of the Royal Aeronautical Society - which represents professionals in the industry - said firms were missing out on bids on the Galileo satellite programme because it is funded by the European Union.Separately, the UK head of aviation giant Airbus - which builds wings for its aeroplanes in north Wales - told the Commons Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) committee that other countries were now "knocking at the door" for that business.MPs were taking evidence as part of an inquiry into the impact of Brexit on aerospace.It came as elsewhere, the Institute of Directors (IoD) added to voices from business warning that a transitional arrangem...
Drone maker DJI in cyber-security row over bug bounty

Drone maker DJI in cyber-security row over bug bounty

Technology
Drone maker DJI has accused a cyber-security researcher of hacking its servers.Kevin Finisterre claims that he accessed confidential customer data after finding a private key publicly posted on code-sharing site Github.He approached the firm, which offers a "bug bounty" reward of up to $ 30,000 (£23,000) for security weaknesses discovered in its systems.DJI said the server access was "unauthorised".The data Mr Finisterre was able to see included "unencrypted flight logs, passports, drivers licences and identification cards", he said.Despite initially offering him the money, in a statement DJI has now accused Mr Finisterre of refusing to agree to the terms of its bug bounty programme "which are designed to protect confidential data and allow time for analysis and resolution of a vulnerabili