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If it flies or hovers, it will be at the Paris Air Show

If it flies or hovers, it will be at the Paris Air Show

Technology
While Airbus and Boeing will again hog the spotlight at the Paris Air Show with their battle for ever-larger slices of the lucrative pie in the sky, a lot of the really interesting stuff will be going on elsewhere at the upcoming biennial aviation and defense industry gathering. Lockheed Martin's F-35 jet will crane necks with high-speed aerial displays, drones will again be a hot topic and a would-be flying car will aim to show that it is closer to getting off the ground as a consumer ride. Defense contractors will be seeking customers for their latest high-tech weapons, including drones designed to act as wingmen to piloted aircraft in battle. More peacefully, there'll be the launch of a distress beacon with an integrated GPS transmitter to help locate planes that go down — an issue of
Questions raised over Battersea Power Station

Questions raised over Battersea Power Station

Technology
The cage that hoists you to the top of the north west chimney of Battersea Power station, 102 metres high, stops with a shudder.Clamber out and you see a wide and telling view. You're eye level with the three other famous chimneys; around you, the cavernous, hollow interior of the turbine hall and switch houses; below, three thousand builders on site, a hive of activity; and following the flow of Thames up to Vauxhall, a mess of crane-strewn sites, the biggest redevelopment project in Europe.I'm here to see the finishing touches put, by hand, to the chimney. One of the conditions for redeveloping the power station was keeping the power station.They were in bad shape, so they were laser scanned, demolished, then rebuilt - using the same technique as their original construction in the 1930s....
Shoppers may see big changes after Amazon buys Whole Foods

Shoppers may see big changes after Amazon buys Whole Foods

Technology
Amazon's $ 13.7 billion acquisition of Whole Foods could mean big changes for the way people buy groceries — and just about everything else.Amazon could try to use automation and data analysis to draw more customers to stores while helping Whole Foods cut costs and perhaps prices. Meanwhile, the more than 460 Whole Foods stores in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. could be turned into distribution hubs — not just for delivering groceries, but also as pickup centers for online orders.Walmart, which has the largest share of the U.S. food market, has already been pushing harder into e-commerce to build on strength in its stores and groceries. It announced Friday that it's buying online men's clothing retailer Bonobos for $ 310 million, following a string of online acquisitions such as ModCloth a
Glastonbury attendees' wee to power displays

Glastonbury attendees' wee to power displays

Technology
The lavatory facilities at festivals can often be feared as pits of despair, but a team of scientists are set to turn Glastonbury goers' wee into energy.Display boards at this year's Glastonbury festival are going to powered by urine, provided via a 40-person urinal which will be situated near to the headline Pyramid stage.Technology designed by scientists at the Bristol Bioenergy Centre (BBiC) can harness the power of pee to illuminate the darkness and charge mobile phones.While this isn't the first time that "Pee Power" has featured at the festival, it is the first time in which it will be used to power information boards keeping attendees in the know.The 40-person urinal will be conveniently placed by the Cider Bus, just a few hundred metres from the Pyramid stage.Scientists and student...
NHS cyber-attack was 'launched from North Korea'

NHS cyber-attack was 'launched from North Korea'

Technology
British security officials believe that hackers in North Korea were behind the cyber-attack that crippled parts of the NHS and other organisations around the world last month, the BBC has learned.Britain's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) led the international investigation.Security sources have told the BBC that the NCSC believes that a hacking group known as Lazarus launched the attack.The US Computer Emergency Response Team has also warned about Lazarus.The same group is believed to have targeted Sony Pictures in 2014.The Sony hack came as the company planned to release the movie The Interview, a satire about the North Korean leadership starring Seth Rogen. The movie was eventually given a limited release after an initial delay.The same group is also thought to have been behind the...