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Living drugs new frontier for cancer patients out of options

Living drugs new frontier for cancer patients out of options

Technology
Ken Shefveland's body was swollen with cancer, treatment after treatment failing until doctors gambled on a radical approach: They removed some of his immune cells, engineered them into cancer assassins and unleashed them into his bloodstream. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in cancer care and this is its next frontier — creating "living drugs" that grow inside the body into an army that seeks and destroys tumors. Looking in the mirror, Shefveland saw "the cancer was just melting away." A month later doctors at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center couldn't find any signs of lymphoma in the Vancouver, Washington, man's body. "Today I find out I'm in full remission — how wonderful is that?" said Shefveland with a wide grin, giving his physician a quick embrace. This experimental t
Microsoft unveils 'most powerful console'

Microsoft unveils 'most powerful console'

Technology
Microsoft has unveiled the next generation of its games console - the Xbox One X - which will be released later this year.Presenting the device to the E3 gaming conference in Los Angeles, Microsoft's Phil Spencer said the console will be launched worldwide on 7 November, costing $ 499 and £449.The console is going to compete with rivals on a graphical processing basis, shipping with six teraflops of graphical computing power running at 1172MHz.This exceeds by some distance the PS4 Pro's 4.2 teraflops at 911MHZ and sets a benchmark that may event tempt PC gamers towards the console.Image:Phil Spencer, head of Xbox, discusses the new console, at E3 (Photo by Casey Rodgers/Invision for Xbox/AP Images)In addition to the console's support for 2160p (also known as 4K) visual display, Microsoft h
Sharp sues Hisense over 'shoddily' made TV sets

Sharp sues Hisense over 'shoddily' made TV sets

Technology
Sharp is suing business partner Hisense, claiming the company is putting its name on low quality TVs.Hisense can make TV sets using the Sharp name thanks to a deal it signed with the company in 2015. Sharp said the TVs bearing its name broke US rules on electromagnetic emissions and that Hisense had made false claims about picture quality.Hisense said it "categorically" denied the claims made in Sharp's court papers and it would defend itself.Court argumentAs well as accusing the Hisense-made TV sets of breaking emission guidelines, Sharp said the devices also broke Federal Trade Commission rules on pictures sizes and did not meet wider industry standards covering device safety. Sharp's legal papers said its brand was at risk of being "destroyed" by the "shoddily manufactured" TV sets by t...
How e-cigarettes can be used to hack computers

How e-cigarettes can be used to hack computers

Technology
Security researchers have demonstrated how e-cigarettes can easily be modified into tools to hack computers.With only minor modifications, the vape pen can be used by attackers to compromise the computers they are connected to - even if it seems just like they are charging.Giving a presentation at BSides London, Ross Bevington showed how an e-cigarette could be used to attack a computer by fooling the computer to believe it was a keyboard or by tampering with its network traffic.While Mr Bevington's particular form of attack required the victim's machine to be unlocked, that was not the case for all attacks.Image:The e-cigarettes can be easy to be modify. Pic: Ross Bevington"PoisonTap is a very similar style of attack that will even work on locked machines," Mr Bevington told Sky News.Anot...
'Facebook blasphemer' given death penalty

'Facebook blasphemer' given death penalty

Technology
A man accused of posting blasphemous content to Facebook has been sentenced to death by a court in Pakistan.Taimoor Raza was convicted after allegedly posting remarks about the Prophet Muhammad, his wives and companions within the site's comments.The public prosecutor involved said he believed it was the first time the death penalty had been awarded in a case related to social media.Human rights campaigners have expressed concern.Facebook itself has yet to comment on the case.The US firm previously announced in March that it was deploying a team to Pakistan to address the government's concerns about blasphemous content on its service, but added that it still wished to protect "the privacy and rights" of its members.Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has described blasphemy as being an ...