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NASA bumps astronaut off space station flight in rare move

NASA bumps astronaut off space station flight in rare move

Technology
NASA has bumped an astronaut off an upcoming spaceflight, a rare move for the space agency so close to launch. Astronaut Jeanette Epps was supposed to rocket away in early June, and would have been the first African-American to live on the International Space Station. Late Thursday, NASA announced it was pulling Epps off the mission but didn't disclose why. Astronauts have been removed from missions in the past, mostly for health reasons. Epps, an engineer, will be considered for future space missions, according to NASA. She's been replaced by her backup, Serena Aunon-Chancellor, a doctor. Both were chosen as astronauts in 2009. Epps is returning to Houston from Russia, where she'd been training to fly to the space station with a German and Russian. NASA spokeswoman Brandi Dean said Friday...
Trump to reauthorise internet surveillance law

Trump to reauthorise internet surveillance law

Technology
A controversial US law which allows warrantless internet surveillance is set to be reauthorised by Donald Trump.On Thursday, the US Senate passed a bill to renew Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) which allows American authorities to conduct mass surveillance on foreign targets on US soil.It now needs to be signed off by the President, who initially suggested he would oppose it on Twitter before quickly retracting his stance in what critics described as a "humiliating backpedal".When the bill was before the House of Representatives, the lower chamber of the US legislature, Mr Trump tweeted: "This is the act that may have been used, with the help of the discredited and phony dossier, to so badly surveil and abuse the Trump Campaign by the previous administration...
How 200,000 antelope suddenly died

How 200,000 antelope suddenly died

Technology
Researchers have discovered the cause of one of the most mysterious mass mortality events to occur in the modern animal world.The world's scientists were baffled in 2015 when 200,000 antelope suddenly dropped dead in Kazakhstan.More than 60% of the global population of saiga antelope died in just three weeks in May 2015, with entire herds mysteriously collapsing across the Betpak-Dala region of Kazakhstan.Saiga antelopes are already a critically endangered species, and despite being a cousin species to the springbok and gazelle, is on the cusp of extinction.Image:Scientists were baffled about the Saiga deathsExaminations of the dead antelope showed that their deaths had been caused by the Pasturella multocide bacteria, but this did not make sense because the bacteria normally lives quite h...
Nintendo Labo: The DIY cardboard accessory for Switch

Nintendo Labo: The DIY cardboard accessory for Switch

Technology
Nintendo has unveiled its latest release, and it's a little less high-tech than you might expect.Dubbed Labo, it is a series of DIY accessories for the hit Nintendo Switch console which are made of cardboard.A preview video suggests they can transform the Switch's Joy-Con controllers into a piano, a fishing rod, a motorbike or even a robot suit.Nintendo said the range of "interactive build-and-play experiences" would be released on 20 April.Initial pricing will start at $ 70 (£51) in the US - including a cartridge of games designed to be played with the homemade controllers and a range of stickers to customise the creations.'So crazy it might just work' Analysis by Dave Lee, BBC North America technology reporterThis cardboard add-on might on the face of it seem a flimsy gimmick, but there
What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

What you need to know about the meteor that caused seismic shock over Michigan

Technology
The meteor that lit up the night sky over southeast Michigan and shook the ground Tuesday night did not actually cause an earthquake, researchers say. In fact, meteors do not cause earthquakes to rupture along a fault, according to William Yeck, a research geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado. The seismic observations associated with the meteor were assigned a magnitude 2.0 by the United States Geological Survey, which said the event was centered about 5 miles west-southwest of New Haven, Michigan, some 40 miles northeast of Detroit. The National Weather Service sent out a tweet that said, "USGS confirms meteor occurred around 810 pm, causing a magnitude 2.0 earthquake." But Yeck said the magnitude cannot be di...