News That Matters

Technology

Police hold 20m facial recognition images

Police hold 20m facial recognition images

Technology
By Alexander J Martin, Technology Reporter and Tom Cheshire, Technology Correspondent - ExclusiveSky News has learned more than 20 million facial recognition images are being held by police in the UK.Public confidence in law enforcement is being undermined by the lack of laws controlling the police's use of facial recognition technology, the independent Biometrics Commissioner has warned.In his first public comments since taking office, Professor Paul Wiles told Sky News the Government's delays in developing rules to address the police's growing databases of innocent citizens' facial images risked damaging the UK's model of policing by consent.The police currently hold "beyond 20 million images" of Britons' faces, said Professor Wiles, a former scientific adviser to government who has held...
DoJ narrows Trump protesters data demand

DoJ narrows Trump protesters data demand

Technology
Visitors to an anti-Trump website will probably not have their internet protocol addresses turned over to the Department of Justice, after a legal standoff with a US web company.DreamHost had argued the DoJ's warrant would have revealed 1.3 million IP addresses.The DoJ has now narrowed the scope of its demand.Disruptj20.org was set up to help arrange a protest at President Trump's inauguration."The government has no interest in records relating to the 1.3 million IP addresses that are mentioned in DreamHost's numerous press releases and opposition briefs," prosecutors said in the new request.They were focused on the use of the website to plan and carry out a criminal act - a "riot" - not the "lawful activities of peaceful protesters", they said.The warrant does not now require certain acce...
Verizon tweaks prices, cuts video quality on unlimited plans

Verizon tweaks prices, cuts video quality on unlimited plans

Technology
Verizon is raising the price of its unlimited plan while introducing a slightly cheaper, more limited version as wireless carriers battle each other for customers. All major carriers now offer unlimited plans after years of steering people toward paying extra for using more data. Verizon, like its rivals, will start charging more for higher-quality video while hoping to attract cost-conscious customers with a cheaper plan. Verizon's unlimited plan had cost $ 80 a month for one line for those who sign up for automatic payments with a checking account or debit card. Beginning Wednesday, it'll cost $ 85 with high-definition video — capped at 720p for phones. Plans with DVD-quality streaming will cost $ 75. For a family of four, the higher-quality version costs $ 200 a month; the cheaper plan
The Latest: Car strikes 2 women watching eclipse, 1 dies

The Latest: Car strikes 2 women watching eclipse, 1 dies

Technology
The Latest on the total solar eclipse crossing the U.S., from Oregon to South Carolina (all times EDT): 7:45 p.m. Authorities say two women watching the eclipse while standing on a sidewalk in Kentucky were struck by a car, and one has died. State Police Trooper Jody Sims says the car crossed the center line and hit a utility pole and the pedestrians Monday in Hyden, about 120 miles (190 kilometers) southeast of Lexington. Sims says 23-year-old Mackenzie P. Hays was pronounced dead, and 41-year-old Rhonda Belcher was flown to the University of Kentucky Hospital in Lexington. Thirty-eight-year-old motorist Alyssa Noble was taken to a medical center. The condition of Wooton and Noble weren't immediately known. State Police Capt. Jennifer Sandlin confirmed the pedestrians were viewing the pa...
Wear solar specs or make a viewer to safely watch eclipse

Wear solar specs or make a viewer to safely watch eclipse

Technology
Solar glasses are a must for safe viewing of Monday's total solar eclipse, the first to span coast to U.S. coast in 99 years. And parents beware: Eye doctors urge strict adult supervision for eclipse watchers under 16 years old. There should be absolutely no peeking without eclipse glasses or other certified filters except during the two minutes or so when the moon completely blots out the sun, called totality. That's the only time it's safe to view the eclipse without protection. When totality is ending, then it's time to put them back on. Totality means 100 percent of the sun is covered. That will occur only along a narrow strip stretching from Oregon, through the Midwestern plains, down to South Carolina. The rest of the U.S. gets a partial eclipse that extends into Canada and to the t...