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Studying 1 million people to end cookie-cutter health care

Studying 1 million people to end cookie-cutter health care

Technology
U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact. Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The massive "All of Us" project instead will push what's called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique to forecast health and treat disease. The goal is to end cookie-cutter health care. A pilot is under way now. If all goes well, the National Institutes of Health plans to open enrollment early next year. Participants will get DNA tests, and report on their diet, sleep, exercise and numerous other health-affecting factors. It's a commitment: The study aims to run for at least 10 years ——— The pilot testi
Federal government notifies 21 states of election hacking

Federal government notifies 21 states of election hacking

Technology
The federal government on Friday told election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems before last year's presidential election. The notification came roughly a year after U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials first said states were targeted by hacking efforts possibly connected to Russia. The states that told The Associated Press they had been targeted included some key political battlegrounds, such as Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. The AP contacted every state election office to determine which ones had been informed that their election systems had been targeted. The others confirming were Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and ...
Uber London loses licence to operate

Uber London loses licence to operate

Technology
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceUber will not be issued a new private hire licence, Transport for London (TfL) has said. TfL concluded the ride-hailing app firm was not fit and proper to hold a London private hire operator licence.It said it took the decision on the grounds of "public safety and security implications".Confirming it would appeal against the decision, Uber said it showed the world "far from being open, London is closed to innovative companies".TfL's concerns include Uber's approach to carrying out background checks on drivers and reporting serious criminal offences.What does the ruling mean?Seven things Londoners will miss if Uber goesNow what next for Uberisation?Your views: Uber London loses licenceUber's current licence is due to run until 30 September.It has ...
The long wait for a Persian iPhone keyboard

The long wait for a Persian iPhone keyboard

Technology
Android devices as well as Apple computers have Persian keyboards, but until this week the option wasn't available on Apple phones or iPads. For years Persian speakers used the Arabic keyboard on the iPhone, which was not really ideal for writing quickly or accurately in Persian. There were lots of petitions to Apple, pressing them to add a Persian keyboard to mobile phones. That finally paid off with the latest release.Arabic and Persian keyboards are very similar. But there are two major issues - the four extra letters in Persian - and the "half space" feature needed for a well-edited Persian message.In order to type the extra four letters in our alphabet we had to press and hold another letter and wait for a window to pop up so we could drag our finger on it and see it on screen. Yet th...
NASA's asteroid chaser swings by Earth on way to space rock

NASA's asteroid chaser swings by Earth on way to space rock

Technology
NASA's asteroid-chasing spacecraft is swinging by Earth on Friday on its way to a space rock. Launched a year ago, Osiris-Rex was on track to pass within about 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers) of the home planet Friday afternoon — above Antarctica. It needs Earth's gravity as a slingshot to put it on a path toward the asteroid Bennu. Osiris-Rex should reach the small, roundish asteroid next year and, in 2020, collect some of its gravel for return to Earth. If all goes well, scientists should get the samples in 2023. Friday's flyby is a quick hello: The spacecraft will zoom by at about 19,000 mph (31,000 kph). NASA has taken precautions to ensure Osiris-Rex — about the size of an SUV — does not slam into any satellites. "Everything looks great! Thanks for the well wishes," the University o