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Uber boss Travis Kalanick quits after revolt

Uber boss Travis Kalanick quits after revolt

Technology
Uber's troubled chief executive, Travis Kalanick, has quit following a revolt by major shareholders.He agreed to leave his post at the taxi app firm after receiving a letter demanding his resignation from some of its top investors.The shareholders joined forces just a week after Mr Kalanick announced he was taking time out to battle personal problems.He confirmed he had quit in a statement to the New York Times which said Uber's mission - currently beset by accusations of a toxic culture - must come first.Video:Uber boss sorry for taxi driver rantMr Kalanick said: "I love Uber more than anything in the world and at this difficult moment in my personal life I have accepted the investors' request to step aside so that Uber can go back to building rather than be distracted with another fight....
Trump: Govt must catch up with tech revolution

Trump: Govt must catch up with tech revolution

Technology
Donald Trump has gathered the most prominent American technology executives to the White House and asked them to reform IT across the federal government.At the first meeting of the American Technology Council - which the president established by executive order in May - Mr Trump stressed the need to "transform and modernise" the US public sector's use of technology."Government needs to catch up with the technology revolution," he said."America should be the global leader in government technology just as we are in every other aspect, and we are going to start our big edge again in technology - such an important industry."We're embracing big change, bold thinking, and outsider perspectives to transform government and make it the way it should be, and at far less cost."Representatives from th...
Harvard freshmen's ouster over posts draws broad response

Harvard freshmen's ouster over posts draws broad response

Technology
Few college-bound kids lose their shot, and their slot, at their dream school once they get in, but it happened at one of the world's most elite institutions and for a reason that has, until recently, hardly registered in the university admissions process: social media. Harvard University's decision to rescind admission offers to 10 incoming freshmen because of offensive Facebook posts comes at a time of heightened attention to free speech and student conduct on U.S. college campuses, and has stirred debate far beyond the halls of the Ivy League school. Other schools say it's an eye-opener for those involved in the admissions process. "We're going to continue to watch how this unfolds and, with other higher ed institutions, learn from it," said Janet Bonkowski, spokeswoman for the Univers...
Personal details of nearly 200 million US citizens exposed

Personal details of nearly 200 million US citizens exposed

Technology
Sensitive personal details relating to almost 200 million US citizens have been accidentally exposed by a marketing firm contracted by the Republican National Committee.The 1.1 terabytes of data includes birthdates, home addresses, telephone numbers and political views of nearly 62% of the entire US population.The data was available on a publicly accessible Amazon cloud server.Anyone could access the data as long as they had a link to it.Political biases exposedThe huge cache of data was discovered last week by Chris Vickery, a cyber-risk analyst with security firm UpGuard. The information seems to have been collected from a wide range of sources - from posts on controversial banned threads on the social network Reddit, to committees that raised funds for the Republican Party.The informati...
If it flies or hovers, it will be at the Paris Air Show

If it flies or hovers, it will be at the Paris Air Show

Technology
While Airbus and Boeing will again hog the spotlight at the Paris Air Show with their battle for ever-larger slices of the lucrative pie in the sky, a lot of the really interesting stuff will be going on elsewhere at the upcoming biennial aviation and defense industry gathering. Lockheed Martin's F-35 jet will crane necks with high-speed aerial displays, drones will again be a hot topic and a would-be flying car will aim to show that it is closer to getting off the ground as a consumer ride. Defense contractors will be seeking customers for their latest high-tech weapons, including drones designed to act as wingmen to piloted aircraft in battle. More peacefully, there'll be the launch of a distress beacon with an integrated GPS transmitter to help locate planes that go down — an issue of