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Q&A: Trump, the post office and Amazon

Q&A: Trump, the post office and Amazon

Technology
A task force will study the U.S. Postal Service under an executive order from President Donald Trump, who has spent weeks criticizing online retailer Amazon and accused it of not paying enough in shipping costs. The order doesn't mention Amazon by name, but Trump has tweeted that the company should pay the post office more for shipping its packages. "Only fools, or worse, are saying that our money losing Post Office makes money with Amazon. THEY LOSE A FORTUNE, and this will be changed," he tweeted earlier this month. The U.S. Postal Service has indeed lost money for years, but package delivery has actually been a bright spot. Here's what you need to know about Trump's order, Amazon and the post office: Q: What does the executive order do? A: It creates a task force to look into the post ...
Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Facebook CEO didn't have all the answers for Congress

Technology
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg often came across as one of the smartest people in the room as he jousted with U.S. lawmakers demanding to know how and why his company peers into the lives of its 2.2 billion users. But while some questions were elementary, others left Zuckerberg unable to offer clear explanations or specific answers. A series of tough inquiries about how much personal information Facebook vacuums up on and off its social network seemed particularly vexing for Zuckerberg, who couldn't quantify it. He was vague about whether Facebook was a monopoly and whether it would offer an ad-free option, as well as about how the company could offer the same level of privacy protection to users around the world. Zuckerberg squirmed when pressed about a 2011 agreement with the Federal Trad...
Google loses 'right to be forgotten' case

Google loses 'right to be forgotten' case

Technology
A businessman fighting for the "right to be forgotten" has won a UK High Court action against Google.The man, who has not been named due to reporting restrictions surrounding the case, wanted search results about a past crime he had committed removed from the search engine.The judge, Mr Justice Mark Warby, ruled in his favour on Friday.But he rejected a separate claim made by another businessman who had committed a more serious crime.The businessman who won his case was convicted 10 years ago of conspiring to intercept communications. He spent six months in jail.The other businessman, who lost his case, was convicted more than 10 years ago of conspiring to account falsely. He spent four years in jail. Both had ordered Google to remove search results about their convictions, including links...
Backpage.com, CEO plead guilty to state, US charges

Backpage.com, CEO plead guilty to state, US charges

Technology
The chief executive of a website that authorities have dubbed a lucrative nationwide "online brothel" pleaded guilty Thursday to state and federal charges including conspiracy and money laundering, and agreed to testify in ongoing prosecutions against others at Backpage.com, authorities said. Federal prosecutors say that Backpage brought in a half-billion dollars since it began in 2004, mostly through prominent risque advertising for escorts and massages, among other services and some goods for sale. Authorities allege the site was often used to traffic underage victims, while company officials said they tried to scrub the website of such ads. Chief Executive Officer Carl Ferrer will serve no more than five years in prison under a California agreement in which he pleaded guilty to one cou...
Telegram chat app blocked in Russia

Telegram chat app blocked in Russia

Technology
The Russian government has started to block messaging app Telegram, according to reports from the local news agency Tass.Russia's media regulator had sought to block the app because the firm has refused to hand over encryption keys used to scramble messages.Telegram had missed a deadline of 4 April to hand over the keys. The company said the way the service was built meant it has no access to customers' encryption keys.Russia's main security agency, the FSB, had said it wants access to the keys so it can read messages and prevent future terror attacks in the country. Media playback is unsupported on your deviceIn its court filing, media regulator Roskomnadzor had said Telegram had failed to comply with its legal requirements as a "distributor of information". Telegram's lawyer, Pavel Chiko...