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Einstein letters on God, McCarthy, Israel go up for auction

Einstein letters on God, McCarthy, Israel go up for auction

Technology
A collection of letters written by Albert Einstein is set to go to auction next week, offering a new glimpse at the Nobel-winning physicist's views on God, McCarthyism and what was then the newly established state of Israel. The five original letters, dated 1951 to 1954 and signed by Einstein, reveal a witty and sensitive side of the esteemed scientist. They were sent to quantum physicist David Bohm, a colleague who fled the United States for Brazil in 1951 after refusing to testify about his links to the Communist Party to the House Un-American Activities Committee. Bohm's widow's estate put the documents on the block after she passed away last year. One of the yellowing pages, bearing Einstein's signature and embossed seal, and a handwritten general relativity equation, opens at $ 8,000...
AP Exclusive: Moonlighting police leave body cameras behind

AP Exclusive: Moonlighting police leave body cameras behind

Technology
That's because most police agencies that make the cameras mandatory for patrol shifts don't require or won't allow body cameras for off-duty officers even if they're working in uniform, leaving a hole in policies designed to increase oversight and restore confidence in law enforcement. Police departments contend that they have only a limited number of body cameras or that there are too many logistical hurdles and costs involved. But that argument doesn't sit well with those who say it shouldn't matter whether an officer is on patrol or moonlighting at a shopping mall. "As long as they have real bullets, they need to have the body cameras," said John Barnett, a civil rights leader in Charlotte, North Carolina, where shootings involving police have put use of the cameras under scrutiny. An ...
Living drugs new frontier for cancer patients out of options

Living drugs new frontier for cancer patients out of options

Technology
Ken Shefveland's body was swollen with cancer, treatment after treatment failing until doctors gambled on a radical approach: They removed some of his immune cells, engineered them into cancer assassins and unleashed them into his bloodstream. Immune therapy is the hottest trend in cancer care and this is its next frontier — creating "living drugs" that grow inside the body into an army that seeks and destroys tumors. Looking in the mirror, Shefveland saw "the cancer was just melting away." A month later doctors at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center couldn't find any signs of lymphoma in the Vancouver, Washington, man's body. "Today I find out I'm in full remission — how wonderful is that?" said Shefveland with a wide grin, giving his physician a quick embrace. This experimental t
Microsoft unveils 'most powerful console'

Microsoft unveils 'most powerful console'

Technology
Microsoft has unveiled the next generation of its games console - the Xbox One X - which will be released later this year.Presenting the device to the E3 gaming conference in Los Angeles, Microsoft's Phil Spencer said the console will be launched worldwide on 7 November, costing $ 499 and £449.The console is going to compete with rivals on a graphical processing basis, shipping with six teraflops of graphical computing power running at 1172MHz.This exceeds by some distance the PS4 Pro's 4.2 teraflops at 911MHZ and sets a benchmark that may event tempt PC gamers towards the console.Image:Phil Spencer, head of Xbox, discusses the new console, at E3 (Photo by Casey Rodgers/Invision for Xbox/AP Images)In addition to the console's support for 2160p (also known as 4K) visual display, Microsoft h
Sharp sues Hisense over 'shoddily' made TV sets

Sharp sues Hisense over 'shoddily' made TV sets

Technology
Sharp is suing business partner Hisense, claiming the company is putting its name on low quality TVs.Hisense can make TV sets using the Sharp name thanks to a deal it signed with the company in 2015. Sharp said the TVs bearing its name broke US rules on electromagnetic emissions and that Hisense had made false claims about picture quality.Hisense said it "categorically" denied the claims made in Sharp's court papers and it would defend itself.Court argumentAs well as accusing the Hisense-made TV sets of breaking emission guidelines, Sharp said the devices also broke Federal Trade Commission rules on pictures sizes and did not meet wider industry standards covering device safety. Sharp's legal papers said its brand was at risk of being "destroyed" by the "shoddily manufactured" TV sets by t...