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Plane in Turkey overshoots icy runway, stops on Black Sea cliff

Plane in Turkey overshoots icy runway, stops on Black Sea cliff

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A commercial jet carrying 168 people overshot an icy airstrip in northern Turkey on Saturday, getting wedged on a cliff just feet from the Black Sea. Despite the horrifying image of the Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800 seen teetering over a muddy cliff at Ankara-Tabzon Airport, all 162 passengers, two pilots, and four cabin crew were unharmed and were freed from its fuselage, the airline confirmed in a statement. The plane came dangerously close to going into the Black Sea. Afterward, the airport shut down operations until Sunday morning, and a probe was launched to figure out why the plane skidded off the runway, Trabzon Gov. Yucel Yavuz told Reuters. Local prosecutors questioned four crew members and two pilots in the wake of the incident, authorities said. They said there were no si...
Donald Trump denies being a racist after reported crude remark

Donald Trump denies being a racist after reported crude remark

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Media playback is unsupported on your devicePresident Donald Trump has denied that he is racist, after a row broke out over his alleged use of the word "shithole" to describe African nations.Mr Trump reportedly used the term last week during a bipartisan Oval Office meeting on immigration reform.He has now told reporters: "I am not a racist. I'm the least racist person you have ever interviewed."It is the first time the president has responded directly to the racism accusations.He made the denial to White House press pool reporters at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach in Florida on Sunday night.What did the president allegedly say?The row broke out after lawmakers from both parties visited the president on Thursday to work on a proposal for a bipartisan immigration deal....
Hawaii told to fix its alert system after false missile alarm

Hawaii told to fix its alert system after false missile alarm

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Media playback is unsupported on your deviceThe US state of Hawaii has been told it did not have "reasonable" safeguards in place to prevent the false missile alert that caused panic on Saturday.Ajit Pai, chairman of America's media regulator, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), said the error was "absolutely unacceptable".The 38-minute delay in issuing the correction made it worse, he added.He called for officials at all levels throughout the US to work together to rectify any vulnerabilities.Residents and visitors to Hawaii were shocked to receive the false alert of an incoming ballistic missile, sent to their mobile phones early on Saturday morning.Apologising afterwards, Hawaii's Governor David Ige said a member of staff had pressed the wrong button, releasing the alert which ...
Panic amid Hawaii false missile alert

Panic amid Hawaii false missile alert

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Television broadcasts and mobile phones in Hawaii were interrupted by an emergency warning of an incoming missile on Saturday.The message sent to mobile phones warned, in capital letters: "Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill."A video on social media showed the emergency system interrupting the broadcast of a football match, with a high-pitched sound alerting viewers to their screens which displayed the same warning.Video:This is not a drill! False alarm sparks panicThe message, which was sent at 8.07am local time (6.07pm GMT), was followed by a retraction 38 minutes later stating the missile alert was a "false alarm".But while the state emergency management agency was struggling to retract the alert, Hawaiians scrambled to find shelter in...
'This is not a drill': Hawaii gets false alert of missile attack from 'wrong button'

'This is not a drill': Hawaii gets false alert of missile attack from 'wrong button'

World
People in Hawaii woke up Saturday to emergency alerts sent to their mobile phones and broadcast on radio and TV warning of an imminent ballistic missile attack. The alert turned out to be false and the result of human error. But for the more than 30 minutes it took before a corrected message was broadcast, the alert caused panic around the state. Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii wrote on Twitter that "the whole state was terrified." The false emergency alert apparently happened because "the wrong button was pushed," Hawaii House Speaker Scott Saiki said in a statement. "This system we have been told to rely upon failed and failed miserably today," Saiki said. "I am deeply troubled by this misstep that could have had dire consequences." He added, "Apparently, the wrong button was pushed a...