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Man City 1-2 Lyon: City reduced to 'a barely recognisable rabble'

Man City 1-2 Lyon: City reduced to 'a barely recognisable rabble'

Sports
In the first half of their shock Champions League defeat by Lyon, I described Manchester City as being a "rabble" - and they really were that bad.When I said that, just after they had gone 2-0 down, I meant they were a team that appeared disorganised and did not look like they were together, which was also conceding possession unnecessarily.Normally that is the state that City reduce other teams too, but at Etihad Stadium on Wednesday night the brilliant side we saw last season was barely recognisable. Why? I think it was down to a combination of things, but it is important to remember this is a bad result for City, but not a catastrophic one.They have got plenty of time to recover and qualif...
'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study

'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study

Science
A new study suggests that ingesting even a single piece of plastic can be deadly for sea turtles.Researchers found there was a one in five chance of death for a turtle who consumed just one item - rising to 50% for 14 pieces. The team found that younger turtles are at a higher risk of dying from exposure to plastic than adults. The authors say their research raises concerns over the long term survival of some turtle species.The never ending surge of plastic into the world's oceans is taking an increasing toll on iconic marine species. While it has been relatively straightforward for researchers to document the threat to animals who become entangled in plastic and drown, determining the impact of consumed plastic is much harder.The authors of this study es...
Hurricane Florence could kill 'a lot of people'

Hurricane Florence could kill 'a lot of people'

World
Media playback is unsupported on your device Hurricane Florence, which is nearing the US East Coast, could kill "a lot of people", officials warn.The Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema) says storm surges could bring catastrophic flooding to inland areas.Nearly 1.7m people along the coastlines of North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia have been ordered to evacuate.Strong winds and heavy rains have already begun lashing North Carolina's coastline, leading to some early flooding.Some 11,000 power outages had already been reported in the state. Reuters news agency reports.Latest updatesFlorence was 155 miles (250km) east of Myrtle Beach in South Carolina at 17:00 EDT (21:00 GMT), and is projected to make landfall on Friday at 08:00 loc...
'A whole heap of negatives' – Scotland suffer worst home defeat in 45 years

'A whole heap of negatives' – Scotland suffer worst home defeat in 45 years

Sports
Scotland will be "embarrassed" by the ease with which they were ripped apart by Belgium at Hampden, says former defender Willie Miller.The Scots were thrashed 4-0 in front of 20,196 fans on Friday, their fifth defeat in their past six friendlies.Two Belgium goals came from Scotland being caught in possession, while a misplaced pass led to another. "You are coming off that pitch quite embarrassed by the manner of the goals," Miller told BBC Scotland."If you're playing Belgium away from home and get beaten 4-0 to the second best team in the world, you can live with that."But at home you are expecting more from Scotland. Although there were positives, you're not expecting to see them losing goal...
Golden eagle genome study 'a conservation game changer'

Golden eagle genome study 'a conservation game changer'

Science
British scientists have made a breakthrough that could help safeguard the future of one of the world's most admired birds - the golden eagle.The majestic king of birds is under threat in some areas, but a study led by the Wellcome Sanger Institute could help them return to those spots.The work to unravel their genetic code is part of a mission to sequence 25 new genomes of UK species.One of the team described the development as a "real game changer". What is a genome and how could it be useful? "We're all made of the same four letters of code," explained Julia Wilson, association director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute. "It's a blueprint written in your DNA - half com...