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EU leaders agree Russia 'highly likely' to blame

EU leaders agree Russia 'highly likely' to blame

World
EU leaders have agreed it is "highly likely" that Russia is responsible for the Salisbury nerve agent attack.Following a working dinner at a Brussels summit on Thursday night, European Council President Donald Tusk revealed the bloc's member states have backed the UK Government's assessment there is "no other plausible explanation" than Moscow's culpability.He posted on Twitter: "#EUCO agrees with UK government that highly likely Russia is responsible for #SalisburyAttack and that there is no other plausible explanation."The comment is likely to satisfy Theresa May's hopes of a strong statement from EU leaders over the attempted murder of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.The UK Government has directly blamed Moscow for the attack in Wiltshire, with traces of nerve a...
Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Artificially cooling Earth is a 'highly risky strategy,' researchers warn

Science
Nov. 14 (UPI) -- Some scientists and policy officials have proposed artificial cooling as a solution to global warming. But a new study suggests any such efforts would present serious risks.One of the most popular forms of geoengineering is the manipulation of clouds, using aerosols to promote cloud formation and cloud brightening. Higher concentrations of clouds -- and brighter clouds -- can help reflect sunlight and reduce warming.The introduction of large amounts of aerosols into the atmosphere by volcanic eruptions has in the past triggered periods of global cooling.But new analysis at the University of Exeter showed such geoengineering efforts could have unintended consequences. An influx of aerosols in the atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere, for example, would be likely to encoura...
Huddle's 'highly secure' work tool exposed KPMG and BBC files

Huddle's 'highly secure' work tool exposed KPMG and BBC files

Technology
The BBC has discovered a security flaw in the office collaboration tool Huddle that led to private documents being exposed to unauthorised parties.A BBC journalist was inadvertently signed in to a KPMG account, with full access to private financial documents.Huddle is an online tool that lets work colleagues share content and describes itself as "the global leader in secure content collaboration".The company said it had fixed the flaw.Its software is used by the Home Office, Cabinet Office, Revenue & Customs, and several branches of the NHS to share documents, diaries and messages."If somebody is putting themselves out there as a world-class service to look after information for you, it just shouldn't happen," said Prof Alan Woodward, from the University of Surrey. "Huddles contain som...