News That Matters

Tag: 2000

Sky Studios Elstree development to create 2,000 jobs

Sky Studios Elstree development to create 2,000 jobs

Business
Sky, the parent firm of Sky News, has announced plans to develop a new 32-acre TV and film studio at Elstree in Hertfordshire, creating up to 2,000 jobs.The company said the proposed new development, beside the current Elstree Studios, represented a "significant new investment in the UK and European creative economy". Sky hoped the new facility, with 14 sound stages, would open in 2022 and attract an additional £3bn of production investment over the first five years of operation. Image: Sky's CEO says the new studios will support production of original content like Chernobyl. Pic: Sky Atlantic/ HBO "Once complete, the site will include production offices, a set construction workshop, a screening cinema and state-of-the-art post-produc
More than 2,000 new flu cases reported, number of deaths remains below ‘epidemic threshold’

More than 2,000 new flu cases reported, number of deaths remains below ‘epidemic threshold’

Health
Dec. 2 (UPI) -- An increasing number of doctor visits across the country are linked with the flu -- a sign the 2019-20 season is officially underway. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's weekly FluView report, released Monday, 2.9 percent of all visits to healthcare providers across the country for the week ending Nov. 23 were related to influenza, up from 2.5 percent the previous week. Once again, seven states -- Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas -- and Puerto Rico reported high flu-related activity over the most recent week covered. Those same regions had reported high activity during the prior week. However, for the first time this flu season, an additional seven states -- Arkansas, Arizona, Connecticut, Nebrask...
Humans were altering the planet as early as 2000 B.C.

Humans were altering the planet as early as 2000 B.C.

Science
Aug. 30 (UPI) -- According to a new study, the Anthropocene began some 4,000 years earlier than previously thought. Archaeological data suggests humans were responsible for significant land-cover changes as early as 2000 B.C. The Anthropocene is the current geological age. It is described as the period in which human activity has been the dominant influence on Earth's climate and the environment. Some scientists contend the Anthropocene began during the late 19th or early 20th century, as the industrial revolution transformed the global economy. Others have argued the epoch began when nuclear weapons testing began altering the atmosphere. But the latest research contends the geological age began much earlier. "The activities of farmers, pastoralists and hunter-gatherers had significantly...
Climate change: Current warming ‘unparalleled’ in 2,000 years

Climate change: Current warming ‘unparalleled’ in 2,000 years

Science
The speed and extent of current global warming exceeds any similar event in the past 2,000 years, researchers say.They show that famous historic events like the "Little Ice Age" don't compare with the scale of warming seen over the last century. The research suggests that the current warming rate is higher than any observed previously.The scientists say it shows many of the arguments used by climate sceptics are no longer valid.When scientists have surveyed the climactic history of our world over the past centuries a number of key eras have stood out. These ranged from the "Roman Warm Period", which ran from AD 250 to AD 400, and saw unusually warm weather across Europe, to the famed Little Ice Age, which saw temperatures drop for centuries from the 1300s...
Glacial melt rates in the Himalayas have more than doubled since 2000

Glacial melt rates in the Himalayas have more than doubled since 2000

Science
June 19 (UPI) -- Global warming is shrinking the glaciers in the Himalayas. According to a new survey, glaciers in the region have lost roughly a vertical foot and a half of ice. Scientists compiled data from satellite observations collected over the last 40 years across India, China, Nepal and Bhutan. The analysis, detailed this week in the journal Science Advances, showed glacial melt rates have doubled since the turn of the century. During the last 18 years, the average glacial melt rate across the world's tallest mountain range was twice what it was between 1975 and 2000. "This is the clearest picture yet of how fast Himalayan glaciers are melting over this time interval, and why," lead researcher Joshua Maurer, a Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observat...