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What you don’t know about advisory fees is costing you

What you don’t know about advisory fees is costing you

Finance
Would you ever buy a house or a car without knowing the cost up front? Of course not. Yet Americans are put to this test every day when it comes to an even bigger financial decision — choosing a financial advisor to manage their life savings.A surprising number of people have no idea how much they're paying their advisor, but this confusion isn't their fault. Fees can be torturously complex, buried in fine print or described so ambiguously that it's impossible to decipher them. Too often, an advisor hands a new client a 100-page brochure that lists every possible fee he or she might pay. With so much information, it takes a Ph.D. to figure out what you're actually being charged.American investors are paying as much as 3.5 percent per year in advisory and fund fees. And while the difference
American accused of tweeting about Zimbabwe president released from jail

American accused of tweeting about Zimbabwe president released from jail

World
Nov. 10 (UPI) -- An American citizen was released from a Zimbabwe jail on $ 1,000 bail Friday after her arrest last week for allegedly calling President Robert Mugabe a "sick and selfish man" on Twitter, her lawyer said.Martha O'Donovan, 25, was released from the Chikurubi maximum security prison outside the capital of Harare."She has been released to U.S. Embassy officials. That's all we can say," Kumbirai Mafunda, a spokesman for Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights, told CNN.Authorities arrested O'Donovan on Nov. 4 during a dawn raid at her Harare residence. Police confiscated her electronic devices, including her laptop.O'Donovan, who works for Magamba TV, a satirical comedy station, was charged with insulting the president and subversion, which carries a sentence of up to 20 years in pri...
What US family told police about alleged pirate attack on merchant ship in Brazil

What US family told police about alleged pirate attack on merchant ship in Brazil

World
An American family found days after an alleged pirate attack on a merchant ship in Brazil told authorities that while they weren't kidnapped, they were held hostage by the river pirates for several hours, according to police. The family of four from California -- Adam Harris Harteau, his wife, Emily Faith Harteau, and their two children -- were aboard a merchant ship traveling from the city of Belem to Macapa when the vessel was attacked by pirates on Sunday, according to police. The family was found Wednesday in Vila Curumu in the state of Para in Brazil, police said. Today, police in Brazil told reporters that the Harteaus told them after the heavily armed pirates attacked, the family was held in one of the ship’s rooms for several hours -- from 3:30 p.m. to midnight -- during which t
A black-rights group warns would-be passengers about American Airlines

A black-rights group warns would-be passengers about American Airlines

Finance
TRAVEL advisory notices, which alert passengers to the risks of going to certain places, are standard business for frequent flyers. But last week brought an unusual one. The National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP), America’s oldest civil-rights organisation, warned black flyers about the dangers of travelling with American Airlines.The NAACP says that  “a pattern of disturbing incidents” has been reported by black passengers specifically about American Airlines. Such incidents “suggest a corporate culture of racial insensitivity and possible racial bias”. Of the four incidents that the NAACP cite, two involved prominent black activists, PR Lockhart notes at Vox, a news site. Although the NAACP does not mention them by name, one is thought to be Rev William
A pint of view: What do farmers think about Brexit?

A pint of view: What do farmers think about Brexit?

Science
What do the farmers out in the field, in the dairy and in the milking parlour think about Brexit? No-one knows what's around the corner for the dairy industry.Specific negotiations over a future trade deal haven't even started. Some experts predict oblivion; others see opportunity. So let's start with what we do know: the state of the industry 20 years ago, and what it's like today.The number of dairy farmers has shrunk dramatically: In 1996 there were around 35,000. Now there are around 13,000 - a drop of almost two-thirds. Farms are getting bigger: The average herd size was 75 cows and now it's 140. And as for the cost of a pint: back in 1996 it was 36 pence, now it's 43 pence - and many farmers say it's too low.So how do those working in the industry feel about what the next 20 years ...