News That Matters

Tag: adapt

To adapt to cities, birds must grow their brains or grow their families

To adapt to cities, birds must grow their brains or grow their families

Science
March 25 (UPI) -- As the planet becomes increasingly urbanized, many species, including birds, are struggling to adapt to human presence. Urbanization can drive some bird species to extinction, but others are capable of thriving in cities. New research -- published this week in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution -- suggests birds have a choice of two strategies for adapting to urban life. They can either grow bigger brains, or they can produce more offspring. Better understanding how different bird species respond to human development can help policymakers craft more effective conservation and protection plans. "Cities are harsh environments for most species and therefore often support much lower biodiversity than natural environments," lead study author Ferran Sayol, postdoc...
As more colleges move to remote learning, students struggle to adapt

As more colleges move to remote learning, students struggle to adapt

Finance
Princeton University's campus was largely deserted as of March 18, 2020 as a growing number of colleges require students to leave for the remainder of the spring semester.Jessica Dickler | CNBC"Stay healthy, stay home," reads a lit-up sign outside the gates of Princeton University.On campus, the majority of students are gone although a few are scattered around, collecting books and research from Firestone Library, which is in the process of closing.A small group of seniors take pictures on the front lawn, holding an orange-and-black Class of 2020 banner. Instead of a graduation photo, this will have to suffice after years of hard work at the Ivy League school.In response to the coronavirus pandemic, a growing number of U.S. colleges have already said their campuses will remain closed until...
Nose receptors adapt to surrounding smells, researchers find

Nose receptors adapt to surrounding smells, researchers find

Science
Feb. 26 (UPI) -- New research suggests the nose adapts to the environment, changing to relay information to the brain about the most common surrounding smells as efficiently as possible. The findings -- published this week in the journal eLife -- could offer new insights into how the mammalian nose and olfactory system evolved, as well as how the system is impacted by the aging process. The nose of a mouse contains some 10 million receptor neurons. These cells are organized into 1,000 types, and each type specializes in receiving certain kinds of molecules. Different types of neurons are activated by a variety of molecules, and different smells activate an array of neurons. As a result, the brain must process activation patterns, or signatures, across the full spectrum of receptor types. ...
Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Jurassic reptiles were forced to adapt to sea level rise

Science
Sept. 4 (UPI) -- New analysis of fossil teeth have offered scientists new insights into the impacts of sea level rise on Jurassic food chains. Sea levels rose considerably over the course of the Jurassic period, the 56 million years between the Triassic and Cretaceous periods. As revealed by the fossil record, some species thrived, while others were pushed to the margins. To better understand the dynamics of this upheaval, scientists studied the shapes and sizes of teeth found among Jurassic strata along the coasts of England. All of the teeth were sourced from marine sediments representing an 18-million-year period when sea levels fluctuated dramatically. The owners of the ancient teeth belonged to a diverse food chain called the Jurassic Sub-Boreal Seaway. The analysis suggests the Jur...
Inbred animals struggle to adapt to environmental changes

Inbred animals struggle to adapt to environmental changes

Science
June 29 (UPI) -- Inbreeding makes animals more vulnerable to environmental changes, new research shows. When scientists inbred beetles, they found the insects made poorer decisions as environmental factors changed. In the lab, researchers observed the behavior of dozens of female burying beetles as they reared their young on the carcass of a dead mouse. In the middle of the experiment, scientists altered the beetles' food source, swapping out the first mouse carcass for a second smaller mouse carcass. Beetles that were inbred failed to adapt, raising too many young despite the smaller food source. The control group, non-inbred beetles, culled portions of their larvae clutch, as the beetles do in the wild, ensuring all of their young are sufficiently fed. The offspring of inbred beetles w...