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Tag: African

African, Haitian migrants stranded in Mexican border city build shantytown

African, Haitian migrants stranded in Mexican border city build shantytown

World
TAPACHULA, Mexico, May 14 (UPI) -- African and Haitian migrants stranded for two months in southern Mexico during an immigration crackdown begun by the United States are living in a roadside shantytown whose squalid conditions endanger health and hurt nearby small businesses, residents and local migrant aid organizations say. "I've never seen it like this and I've lived here 30 years. My business is suffering," said Narciso Lopez Flores, a convenience store owner. "Piles of trash are everywhere and people are defecating near to where they have to sleep. I'm worried about everybody's health, my family's and theirs." Mexico's crackdown on undocumented migrants trying to reach the U.S.-Mexico border has gone into high gear. Rigorous immigration in southern Mexico is one of the government's r...
Rescuers free South African baby from storm drain

Rescuers free South African baby from storm drain

Business
Feb. 11 (UPI) -- Authorities in South Africa rescued a newborn baby that had been trapped in a storm drain for several hours Monday afternoon. The newborn girl, whom doctors believe is no more than 3 days old, was diagnosed with mild hypothermia at a local hospital after she was freed from the drain in the city of Durban. Hospital staff declared her survival a "miracle," as she was discovered after passersby heard the faint sounds of her crying. People used their cupboard doors to form makeshift barriers to hold back dirt around rescuers as they worked to free the infant. "The main problem was that she was very cold," Timothy Hardcastle, a doctor at Chief Albert Luthuli Hospital, told News 24. "We warmed her up and washed off dust and cleaned her abrasions. Our colleagues from pediatrics ...
Satellites warn African farmers of pest infestations

Satellites warn African farmers of pest infestations

Science
UK researchers have developed an early warning system to prevent the crops of African farmers from being devastated. The Pest Risk Information Service (Prise) combines temperature data and weather forecasts with computer models. It then sends farmers a mobile phone alert so that they can take precautions.It is hoped that the system will boost yields and increase farm incomes by up to 20%.Prise is being used in Kenya, Ghana and Zambia and will be rolled out soon in other parts of the world.Prise is an upgrade of a highly successful UK Aid scheme run by the Centre for Agriculture and Bioscience International development charity (CABI). It uses a network of so called "plant doctors" and clinics to advise farmers when pests or diseas...
South African beekeepers blame insecticide for 1M-plus bee deaths

South African beekeepers blame insecticide for 1M-plus bee deaths

World
Nov. 26 (UPI) -- More than 1 million bees died near Cape Town, South Africa, a disaster beekeepers are blaming on the misuse of an agricultural pesticide called Fipronil. Brendan Ashley-Cooper, vice-president of the Western Cape bee association, said about 100 of hives had been affected and estimates between 1 million and 1.5 million of his bees have died. He said the deaths would not greatly affect the country's overall bee population, though the overall number of deaths is unknown, the BBC reported. It will have a small impact on this year's honey production. "A week ago we started getting calls that be beekeepers were finding dead bees in front of their hives. I came to inspect my bee site and found similar results and found thousands upon thousands of dead bees in front of a lot of my...
Humans 'off the hook' for African mammal extinction

Humans 'off the hook' for African mammal extinction

Science
New research has disputed a longstanding view that early humans helped wipe out many of the large mammals that once roamed Africa.Today, Africa broadly has five species of massive, plant-eating mammal; but millions of years ago there were many more types of giant herbivore.Why so many types vanished is not known, but many experts have blamed our tool-using, meat-eating ancestors.Now, researchers say the mammal decline began long before humans appeared.Writing in the journal Science, Tyler Faith, from the Natural History Museum of Utah, and colleagues argue that long-term environmental change drove the extinctions.This mainly took the form of an expansion of grasslands, in response to falling atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂)...