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Tag: Airlines

After DGCA whip, airlines junk flat Rs 3,000 cancellation fee

After DGCA whip, airlines junk flat Rs 3,000 cancellation fee

Finance
Cancellation charges for 'cheap' domestic air tickets will no longer be a flat Rs 3,000. Indian airlines say their domestic cancellation charges will be "Rs 3,000 or base fare plus fuel surcharge per passenger, whichever is lower." This will provide relief to those who manage to buy cheap air tickets, mostly by buying in advance, but ended up losing a lot of money while cancelling them if unable to travel for some reason. However, domestic travellers, whose base fare and fuel surcharges combined is more than Rs 3,000, will continue paying that as cancellation fee. The change in rule comes after aviation minister Jayant Sinha recently voiced concern over the flat Rs 3,000 domestic cancellation fee being too high. The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) then wrote to airlines,...
How airlines are squeezing more seats onto their planes

How airlines are squeezing more seats onto their planes

Finance
WHEN Gary Leff, a prominent travel blogger, took his first flight on one of the new “no legroom” planes operated by American Airlines, he found that the experience was not nearly as bad as he feared. American had drawn howls of protest from customers when it announced it was reducing the distance between rows of seats—“seat pitch”, in industry jargon—on its new Boeing 737 Max planes to 29 inches, compared with the 31-inch pitch on its existing 737-800s. So in June it capitulated, and settled on 30 inches. Mr Leff tried out these new seats last week and was pleasantly surprised to find that “the seats themselves are no worse than” in American’s current layout in economy. That may seem counterintuitive, but aircraft-interior designers had come to American’s rescue. New thinner seats have ena
A black-rights group warns would-be passengers about American Airlines

A black-rights group warns would-be passengers about American Airlines

Finance
TRAVEL advisory notices, which alert passengers to the risks of going to certain places, are standard business for frequent flyers. But last week brought an unusual one. The National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP), America’s oldest civil-rights organisation, warned black flyers about the dangers of travelling with American Airlines.The NAACP says that  “a pattern of disturbing incidents” has been reported by black passengers specifically about American Airlines. Such incidents “suggest a corporate culture of racial insensitivity and possible racial bias”. Of the four incidents that the NAACP cite, two involved prominent black activists, PR Lockhart notes at Vox, a news site. Although the NAACP does not mention them by name, one is thought to be Rev William
Redundancies follow Monarch Airlines collapse

Redundancies follow Monarch Airlines collapse

Business
Administrators say 1,858 Monarch staff have been made redundant following the collapse of Britain's fifth-biggest airline.Approximately 860,000 passengers have been affected by the carrier's demise - and 110,000 people currently stranded abroad are being flown home in "the country's biggest-ever peacetime repatriation".Monarch's collapse has also meant that the future bookings of 750,000 passengers have been cancelled with immediate effect.:: What to do if you've booked with MonarchImage:Part of a letter handed to passengers at GatwickThose who have bought flights are being urged not to travel to airports, and to check the Civil Aviation Authority's website for information.Dozens of aircraft are being chartered to fly holidaymakers back to the UK - and passengers arriving back in Birmingha...
Complaints against America’s airlines are rising

Complaints against America’s airlines are rising

Finance
LAST year, Bob Fornaro, the boss of Spirit Airlines, talked of the effort his firm had made to reduce the number of customer complaints. The ultra-low-cost carrier, dubbed the most hated airline in America by Bloomberg, had long been ranked as a primary purveyor of passenger pain, regularly propping up lists that rate airline service. Alas, Mr Fornaro’s efforts seem to have gone unrewarded. Complaints per passenger remain easily the highest of any of the big American operators. In fact, as our chart shows, things seem to be getting worse.One consolation for Spirit is that the same is true of nearly all its competitors. Of the 12 biggest carriers in the country, only Hawaiian saw a (tiny) decrease in complaints in April 2017, compared with a year earlier. Delta, Virgin America and ExpressJe