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5 Real Women Share What It Was Like Giving Up Alcohol for a Month

5 Real Women Share What It Was Like Giving Up Alcohol for a Month

Health
Until last month, I did not fully understand the effects of alcohol. Sure, I’d experienced a tipsy night out and enjoyed the next day’s lovely hangover. But when I gave up alcohol (one of many rules of the Whole30 program, which I did in January), I gradually became aware of how much things change when you part with your Pinot noir.I definitely experienced health perks: I was able to focus my energy on quality catch-ups over coffee, didn’t have liquor-induced late night cravings, and made it to more morning workout classes than usual. Yet what shocked me was how much my social life shifted over the course of 30 days.RELATED: What's the Lowest Calorie Alcohol? 8 Drinks RankedA friend’s request to meet for a “quick drink” led to my long explanation about my no-alcohol decision
Study reveals low alcohol consumption has brain-cleansing function

Study reveals low alcohol consumption has brain-cleansing function

Health
Feb. 2 (UPI) -- Drinking alcohol at low levels can clear away brain toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease, a study published Friday indicates.The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that low levels of consumption reduced inflammation in the brains of mice.Researchers focused on the glymphatic system, a brain-cleaning process first described in 2012 by Dr. Maiken Nedergaard, the lead author of the new study.The system works by pumping cerebral spinal fluid into brain tissue to flush away waste, including proteins associated with dementia. Follow-up studies indicate that the glymphatic system works best during sleep and improves with exercise.The new study showed that animals exposed to long-term use of alcohol displayed high levels of a marker ...
Here's What Can Happen to Your Body When You Cut Out Alcohol

Here's What Can Happen to Your Body When You Cut Out Alcohol

Health
This is all the motivation you need for Dry January. The latest New Year’s trend has nothing to do with alcohol—literally. For millions of people, January 1 marks the first day of not just a new year, but a “dry” January, or month-long break with booze. Started by the UK's Alcohol Concern organization in 2013, the movement’s main goal is to help people "reset their relationship with alcohol." But what happens to your body when you become a temporary teetotaler?“Nothing bad,” says Jamile Wakim-Fleming, MD, a hepatologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “[Abstaining temporarily] is only going to be beneficial.” (One caveat: heavy drinkers should only quit with medical assistance, since they can experience a life-threatening form of withdrawal.)Thi
Dry January: Why I'm giving up alcohol for a month

Dry January: Why I'm giving up alcohol for a month

Health
Dry January, giving up alcohol for the entire month of January, has become a common New Year’s resolution and Dr. Jennifer Ashton of ABC News’ "Good Morning America" is taking on the alcohol-free challenge this month. “It’s just a little experiment I am doing, kicking off 2018,” Ashton, ABC News' chief medical correspondent, said. “There’s a saying in medicine: Doctor heal thyself. I give this advice to women every single day, but we’ll see if I can take my advice."Ashton spoke to "GMA" about her reasons for doing Dry January and her comments are lightly edited and transcribed below. Send us your comments and advice with #DryJENuary on Twitter. I have decided to try Dry January and I’m inviting you guys to try it with me. Why did I decide to do it? Good question. I think more curiosity fro
This Type of Alcohol Makes You Feel Sexy, According to Science

This Type of Alcohol Makes You Feel Sexy, According to Science

Health
Spirits—like vodka, gin, whiskey and other hard alcohols—were linked to a range of strong feelings. If you’re trying to wind down after a long day, wine may help you relax, a new study suggests. But if you’re more in the mood to feel sexy and confident, order spirits instead.A group of researchers in the U.K. set out to determine whether different types of alcohol prompt different emotional responses among drinkers. They used data from almost 30,000 people who responded to the Global Drug Survey, a yearly international poll about drug and alcohol habits around the world, and published their results in the British Medical Journal.Spirits — like vodka, gin, whiskey and other hard alcohols — were linked to a range of strong feelings. They were most likely bring up n