News That Matters

Tag: alert

RBI must act as an alert inspector, not just off-site surveyor, says bank union

RBI must act as an alert inspector, not just off-site surveyor, says bank union

Finance
Reserve Bank union today requested Governor Urjit Patel to monitor banks through a combination of risk-based supervision, off-site surveillance and on-site inspections of operational systems. In a letter written to the governor, the union suggested that the RBI should undertake random supervision of bank branches in all parts of the country periodically - possibly 10 per cent of bank branches comprising all regions on an annual basis. "We would request you that RBI monitoring of banks should be a triad - a combination of risk-based supervision, off-site surveillance and random on-site inspections of operational systems, which, we feel, will give the best result instead of RBI totally dispensing with on-site inspections," the union said in the letter. "We strongly feel that RBI must remain ...
Measles alert issued for Chicago O'Hare air travelers

Measles alert issued for Chicago O'Hare air travelers

Health
A measles alert was issued Monday, four days after an air passenger who was diagnosed with the highly contagious virus passed through two terminals at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. Somewhere between the hours of 6:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Jan. 10, according to a statement obtained by ABC News and released by the Illinois Department of Public Health, "a passenger on an international flight with a confirmed case of measles arrived in Terminal 5" of the airport and the person "departed on a domestic flight from Terminal 1." The statement warned that this passenger "was infectious that day" and "may have traveled to other parts of the airport." This marks at least the second potential measles exposure case this year involving U.S. aiports. Last week, a female college student traveling...
Hawaii told to fix its alert system after false missile alarm

Hawaii told to fix its alert system after false missile alarm

World
Media playback is unsupported on your deviceThe US state of Hawaii has been told it did not have "reasonable" safeguards in place to prevent the false missile alert that caused panic on Saturday.Ajit Pai, chairman of America's media regulator, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), said the error was "absolutely unacceptable".The 38-minute delay in issuing the correction made it worse, he added.He called for officials at all levels throughout the US to work together to rectify any vulnerabilities.Residents and visitors to Hawaii were shocked to receive the false alert of an incoming ballistic missile, sent to their mobile phones early on Saturday morning.Apologising afterwards, Hawaii's Governor David Ige said a member of staff had pressed the wrong button, releasing the alert which ...
Panic amid Hawaii false missile alert

Panic amid Hawaii false missile alert

World
Television broadcasts and mobile phones in Hawaii were interrupted by an emergency warning of an incoming missile on Saturday.The message sent to mobile phones warned, in capital letters: "Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawaii. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill."A video on social media showed the emergency system interrupting the broadcast of a football match, with a high-pitched sound alerting viewers to their screens which displayed the same warning.Video:This is not a drill! False alarm sparks panicThe message, which was sent at 8.07am local time (6.07pm GMT), was followed by a retraction 38 minutes later stating the missile alert was a "false alarm".But while the state emergency management agency was struggling to retract the alert, Hawaiians scrambled to find shelter in...
'This is not a drill': Hawaii gets false alert of missile attack from 'wrong button'

'This is not a drill': Hawaii gets false alert of missile attack from 'wrong button'

World
People in Hawaii woke up Saturday to emergency alerts sent to their mobile phones and broadcast on radio and TV warning of an imminent ballistic missile attack. The alert turned out to be false and the result of human error. But for the more than 30 minutes it took before a corrected message was broadcast, the alert caused panic around the state. Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii wrote on Twitter that "the whole state was terrified." The false emergency alert apparently happened because "the wrong button was pushed," Hawaii House Speaker Scott Saiki said in a statement. "This system we have been told to rely upon failed and failed miserably today," Saiki said. "I am deeply troubled by this misstep that could have had dire consequences." He added, "Apparently, the wrong button was pushed a...