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Degenerative eye conditions linked to Alzheimer's in study

Degenerative eye conditions linked to Alzheimer's in study

Health
Aug. 8 (UPI) -- Researchers have found a significant link between three degenerative eye diseases and Alzheimer's disease risk, offering a potential way for medical providers to detect the memory loss condition. Age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma were associated with an increased prevalence in cognitive decline that are part of Alzheimer's, researchers report in findings published Wednesday in the journal Alzherimer's & Dementia. Another degenerative eye condition, a cataract, wasn't an Alzheimer's disease risk factor, the researchers found. "What we found was not subtle," Dr. Paul Crane, professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine said in a press release. "This study solidifies that there are mechanistic things we can learn fr...
Herpesvirus may contribute to Alzheimer's development, researchers say

Herpesvirus may contribute to Alzheimer's development, researchers say

Health
June 21 (UPI) -- Certain species of herpesviruses may play a role in Alzheimer's disease according to a study of brain samples from people with and without the disease. Researchers made the discovery after examining data from brain banks and cohort studies that are part of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership -- Alzheimer's Disease consortium. But the researchers, who published their findings Thursday in the journal Neuron, emphasize that their research doesn't prove that the viruses cause the onset or progression of Alzheimer's. Currently, no effective prevention or treatment exists for this progressive deterioration of brain tissue, memory and identity, but researchers are hopeful that new, better treatments can emerge as a result of their work. "The hypothesis that viruses play a pa...
Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Deep brain stimulation promising for mild Alzheimer's patients older than 65

Health
June 19 (UPI) -- Alzheimer's patients older than 65 benefit the most benefit from deep brain stimulation, according to findings from a recent phase II clinical trial. Researchers at Toronto Western Hospital's Krembil Neuroscience Center for two years have been studying the stimulation of the fornix, a bundle of nerve fibers in the brain between the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. The findings, published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, are an analysis of follow-up data during the second 12 months of a 2016 clinical trial. "We are encouraged by these findings as they continue to help us identify who will benefit most from DBS to treat Alzheimer's disease and learn more about this illness," Dr. Andres Lozano, a neurosurgeon at the Krembil Neuroscience Center and principa...
Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Alzheimer's disease reversed in mice, offering hope for humans, new research shows

Health
"Remarkable" -- that’s how researchers are describing the results of a new study done on mice displaying traits associated with Alzheimer's disease. The deletion of just a single enzyme saw the near total reversal of the deposition of amyloid plaques found in brains of those with Alzheimer's, improving cognitive functions in the mouse subjects, according to the study from researchers at the Cleveland Clinic, published Feb. 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. These promising research findings center around deleting a gene that produces an enzyme called BACE1, which helps make the beta-amyloid peptides that accumulate abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. Studies have shown that stopping or reducing that enzyme’s activity dramatically reduces production of b
Memory problems predict Alzheimer's onset, study says

Memory problems predict Alzheimer's onset, study says

Health
Feb. 15 (UPI) -- Individuals who are not aware of their own memory problems are nearly three times more likely to develop some form of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, within two years, according to research at McGill University in Montreal.In a study published Thursday in the journal Neurology, a team from McGill's Translational Neuroimaging Laboratory studied individuals who experience memory lapses. The study was led by Dr. Pedro Rosa-Neto, co-senior author of the study and clinician scientist and director of the McGill Center for Studies in Aging."This study could provide clinicians with insights regarding clinical progression to dementia," Rosa-Neto said in a press release.Anosognosia, frequently referred to as a lack of insight, is a common symptom of certain mental illnesses...