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The Amazon is flooding five times more often than it used to

The Amazon is flooding five times more often than it used to

Science
Sept. 19 (UPI) -- The Amazon, the world's largest river, is flooding five times more frequently than it did 100 years ago. Scientists in England, Chile and Brazil analyzed river level records dating back more than a century. The data showed extreme floods -- when water levels rise at least 95 feet, triggering an emergency declaration in the city of Manaus -- occurred approximately once every 20 years during the first half of the 20th century. Today, extreme floods occur every four years. "Increases of severe droughts in the Amazon have received a lot of attention by researchers," Jonathan Barichivich, researcher at the Austral University of Chile, said in a news release. "However, what really stands out from this long-term river record is the increase in the frequency and severity of the ...
Church of England to keep Amazon shares despite Welby criticism

Church of England to keep Amazon shares despite Welby criticism

Technology
The Church of England has said it will keep its shares in Amazon - a day after the Archbishop of Canterbury said the firm was "leeching off the taxpayer".The Church Times has revealed Amazon was among the 20 biggest global investments by the Church last year. A statement from the CofE said it considered the most effective way to seek change was to be "in the room with these companies" as a shareholder.Amazon has repeatedly said it pays all taxes required in the UK.Archbishop Justin Welby, in a speech to the Trades Union Congress on Wednesday, said: "When vast companies like Amazon and other online traders, the new industries, can get away with paying almost nothing in tax, there is something wrong with the tax system."They don't pay a real living wage, so...
Apple v Amazon: Battle of the titans

Apple v Amazon: Battle of the titans

Business
In early September, Amazon's market value briefly went over $ 1tn (£779bn), just over a month after Apple became the first public company in the world to achieve such a feat. Both tech companies have grown over the last few years, but will this continue?Apple and Amazon are as different from each other as apples and oranges.Apple is a tech company that is also a trendy consumer brand. Its computers and devices have often been must-have gadgets, and customers are willing to pay far more for their products than cheaper alternatives. On the other hand, Amazon is where people go when they want to get a product more cheaply, more easily, or more quickly.Since the iPhone first went on sale in 2007, Apple shares have soared by 1,1...
'We are totally happy,' says paid Amazon workers on Twitter

'We are totally happy,' says paid Amazon workers on Twitter

Technology
Amazon is taking an out-of-the box approach to answering its critics — paying workers to be "ambassadors" and tweet full-time about how satisfied they were at their jobs. One worker who Amazon says used to pack boxes at its warehouse in Jacksonville, Florida, tweeted about air circulation at the online retailer's warehouse being "very good." Plus, the worker whose account gives her name as Shauntrelle, says workers there get two 30-minute breaks during their 10-hour shifts, something she calls "a benefit." Others on social media were skeptical of her cheery messages, calling her a bot. Shauntrelle responded to them, too, even with a misspelling: "We are totally noraml and not bots and we are totally happy working for an amazing company." The tweets are part of Amazon's plan to figh...
Rare footage of never-before-seen Amazon tribe filmed by drone

Rare footage of never-before-seen Amazon tribe filmed by drone

World
Deep in Brazil's Amazon rainforest, in a part seemingly unmarred by civilization, lives a secluded tribe. Its people have lived quiet, unobtrusive lives, hidden from the eyes of the world for centuries -- until now, when researchers managed to capture them on camera for what is believed to be the first time ever. Brazil’s agency for indigenous affairs, Funai, this week released video of several members of the tribe walking across a clearing in Vale do Javari, an indigenous territory in the state of Amazonas. The video was captured by a drone last year and gives a rare glimpse into the existence of the isolated tribe. “These images have the power to make society and the government reflect on the importance of protecting these groups,” Funai's president Wallace Bas...