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Tag: Amazon

TikTok: Amazon says email asking staff to remove app ‘sent in error’

TikTok: Amazon says email asking staff to remove app ‘sent in error’

Technology
Amazon has said an email sent to employees asking them to remove the video-sharing app TikTok from any mobile device that can access their company email was sent in error.An internal memo sent to staff earlier on Friday had said employees should delete the app over "security risks".The app, owned by a Chinese company, has come under scrutiny because of fears it could share data with China. TikTok said it did not understand Amazon's concerns. "This morning's email to some of our employees was sent in error. There is no change to our policies right now with regard to TikTok", a company spokesperson told the BBC. But earlier on Friday, a memo sent to staff seen by multiple news outlets stated that the app must be removed from mobile devices. "Due to security...
How one teaspoon of Amazon soil teems with fungal life

How one teaspoon of Amazon soil teems with fungal life

Science
A teaspoon of soil from the Amazon contains as many as 1,800 microscopic life forms, of which 400 are fungi. Largely invisible and hidden underground, the "dark matter" of life on Earth has "amazing properties", which we're just starting to explore, say scientists.The vast majority of the estimated 3.8 million fungi in the world have yet to be formally classified.Yet, fungi are surprisingly abundant in soil from Brazil's Amazon rainforest. To help protect the Amazon rainforest, which is being lost at an ever-faster rate, it is essential to understand the role of fungi, said a team of researchers led by Prof Alexandre Antonelli, director of science at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew."Take a teaspoon of soil and you will find hundre...
Amazon v EU: Has the online giant met its match?

Amazon v EU: Has the online giant met its match?

Technology
Covid-19 has not been a harbinger of doom for Amazon, unlike the case with many other firms.Its share price has actually increased since March - hitting a record high last week.It turns out online retail isn't a bad space to be in when all the shops are shut. Jeff Bezos' mantle as the richest man on the planet seems safe, for now. But around the world, governments are looking at Amazon and asking whether the tech giant is - well - too big. Does it use its dominant position unfairly?The EU now looks set to charge Amazon for anti-competitive behaviour. This could cost Amazon a lot of money and could alter the shopping experience it offers customers.What is the EU doing? Central to the EU's concerns is Amazon's dual role. It runs an online store and also sel...
Amazon bans police use of its face recognition for a year

Amazon bans police use of its face recognition for a year

Technology
Amazon says it will ban police use of its facial recognition technology for a year in order to give Congress time to come up with ways to regulate the technologyBy JOSEPH PISANI and MATT O'BRIEN Associated PressJune 11, 2020, 1:20 AM5 min read5 min readShare to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail this articleNEW YORK -- Amazon on Wednesday banned police use of its face-recognition technology for a year, making it the latest tech giant to step back from law-enforcement use of systems that have faced criticism for incorrectly identifying people with darker skin. The Seattle-based company did not say why it took action now. Ongoing protests following the death of George Floyd have focused attention on racial injustice in the U.S. and how police use technology to track people. Floyd died May 25 aft...
Amazon UK website defaced with racist abuse

Amazon UK website defaced with racist abuse

Business
Amazon has blamed a "bad actor" for racist abuse that appeared on multiple listings on its UK website.The abuse, now removed, appeared when users searched the online shop for Apple AirPods and similar products.It was unclear how long the racist language remained on the site, but it sparked outrage on Twitter and the sharing of screenshots and video grabs."We investigated, removed the images in question and took action against the bad actor," Amazon told the BBC.The company did not elaborate on the "bad actor", nor give details of how many products were defaced and how long the abuse was visible on the listings. Nadine White, a journalist for the Huffington Post, tweeted that the abuse "needs to be acknowledged, removed, explained, apologised for asap. Bei...