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Tag: Americans

Here's why most Americans tap their retirement savings early

Here's why most Americans tap their retirement savings early

Finance
Most people don't intend to raid their retirement accounts — and that's just the problem. Tapping your retirement dollars early is almost always considered taboo, although, at times, it can seem unavoidable. By far, the majority of Americans said they dipped into their retirement funds to pay off debt or bills, according to a recent report by GoBankingRates. The other most common reasons cited were to cover a financial emergency or medical expense. Less than 10 pe...
Most Americans aren't happy with their salaries. Here's how to change that

Most Americans aren't happy with their salaries. Here's how to change that

Finance
Asking for a raise: Women vs. men Salary isn't the only factor that can determine our happiness at work, but it's a big one, for sure. Unfortunately, 65% of full-time workers don't earn the salary they want, according to CareerBuilder, and a big reason boils down to the fact that they haven't asked for more money. Specifically, 56% of employees say they've never requested a raise — but 66% of those who have asked received one. If you're dissatisfied with your earnings, you shouldn't hesitate to make the case for a higher salary. Here's how to pull off that conversation successfully. 1. Know your worth It's one thing to think you're making less than you should be, but it's another to back up that claim with numbers. Going into a raise negotiation with firm data wi...
Trump proposal could push health premiums up by $2K for older Americans

Trump proposal could push health premiums up by $2K for older Americans

Finance
A federal proposal to expand short-term health plans could mean older Americans with insurance through the Affordable Care Act will pay an average of $ 2,000 more in 2019 premiums, according to the AARP.The rule proposal, issued jointly by several federal agencies last month due to a 2017 directive by President Trump, would allow short-term health-care policies to span 364 days instead of the current three months.While federal officials say the intention is to provide more affordable coverage options, critics say the move — coupled with the recent elimination of a penalty for non-coverage starting in 2019 — could drive even more young and healthy consumers away from the ACA marketplace. Short-term plans come with limited coverage and are largely unavailable to people with health problems."
Racial gap in heart health down due to declining health of white Americans: Study

Racial gap in heart health down due to declining health of white Americans: Study

Health
A new study out of UCLA has shown that health disparities between black and white Americans have decreased because overall heart health for white Americans has declined. Researchers looked at health records 40,876 adults -- white Americans, African-Americans, and Mexican-Americans -- and sorted them as having either “optimal,” “suboptimal” or “poor” cardiovascular health, using a standardized classification system. The study was published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers noted that between 1988 and 1994, the number of black Americans ages 25 to 44 in "optimal" health was 22 percent lower than in white Americans. For black Americans ages 65 and older, it was 8 percent lower than white Americans in the same period. Those numbers have changed -- but those in good heart healt
Ancient DNA gives glimpse of ancestors of Native Americans

Ancient DNA gives glimpse of ancestors of Native Americans

Technology
DNA from an infant who died in Alaska some 11,500 years ago is giving scientists the best look yet at the genetics of the ancestors of today's native peoples of the Americas. Decoding the infant's complete set of DNA let researchers estimate the timing of key events in the ancestral history of today's Native Americans and indigenous peoples of Canada and Central and South America. Expert said that while the new work doesn't radically change the outlines of what scientists have thought, it provides more detail and better evidence than what was available before. The infant girl was buried about 50 miles southeast of Fairbanks, and her remains are the earliest known in the far north of North America, said anthropologist Ben Potter of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He reports the analysi...