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Female hunters were common in early hunter-gatherer groups in the Americas

Female hunters were common in early hunter-gatherer groups in the Americas

Science
Nov. 4 (UPI) -- Analysis of ancient burial sites suggests female hunters were common among hunter-gatherer groups in the Americas. After discovering a 9,000-year-old female hunter buried in the Andes Mountains, researchers decided to undertake an expansive review of the literature on late Pleistocene and early Holocene burials. Advertisement After reviewing documented accounts of 429 individuals from 107 burial sites, researchers were able to identify 27 female individuals buried with big-game hunting tools. The analysis confirmed the Wilamaya Patjxa female, unearthed in the Andes in 2018, as the oldest known hunter burial in the Americas. The findings, published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, suggest labor among early human societies in the Americas was shared relatively eve...

The pandemic is driving millions of America’s ‘working poor’ to the edge

Finance
Miami resident Willie Mae Daniels, with granddaughter, Karyah Davis, 6, was laid off from her job as a food service cashier at the University of Miami on March 17.Joe Raedle | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesIn just the past six months, more than 22 million American jobs have been lost, and fewer than half have so far returned. Even when they were working, many people weren't earning enough to get by.Trying to survive on low-paying jobs prompted journalist David Shipler in 2004 to write, The Working Poor: Invisible in America. Over five years, he interviewed families across the country who were in the job market but unable to lift themselves out of poverty.With so many people out of work during the pandemic, Shipler fears the problems he wrote more than a decade ago will only get muc...
Earliest evidence for humans in the Americas

Earliest evidence for humans in the Americas

Science
Humans settled in the Americas much earlier than previously thought, according to new finds from Mexico.They suggest people were living there 33,000 years ago, twice the widely accepted age for the earliest settlement of the Americas.The results are based on work at Chiquihuite Cave, a high-altitude rock shelter in central Mexico.Archaeologists found thousands of stone tools suggesting the cave was used by people for at least 20,000 years.Ice ageDuring the second half of the 20th Century, a consensus emerged among North American archaeologists the Clovis people had been the first to reach the Americas, about 11,500 years ago.The Clovis were thought to have crossed a land bridge linking Siberia to Alaska during the last ice age. T...
Op-Ed: With today’s market volatility, the ‘4% rule’ creates risk for America’s retirees

Op-Ed: With today’s market volatility, the ‘4% rule’ creates risk for America’s retirees

Finance
For decades, financial advisors have counseled clients that they should be able to safely withdraw 4% of their assets each year as a means of providing income, while maintaining an account balance large enough to keep income flowing through retirement. While some of the underlying thinking behind the so-called 4% rule was prudent, it was hatched in an era in which interest rates were much higher, capital markets less volatile and, most important, Americans had shorter lifespans.Given today's market volatility and changed retirement landscape, it's safe to assume that the 4% rule may be obsolete. To validate this assumption, we set out to determine whether this rule was sufficient to compensate for the many financial risks that retiring baby boomers and subsequent generations will carry wit...
Boulders offer new clues about early human migration to the Americas

Boulders offer new clues about early human migration to the Americas

Science
June 1 (UPI) -- Recent archaeological evidence has sparked a new theory of when and how the first people came to the Americas. Scientists now theorize that the first Americans took a coastal route along Alaska's Pacific border to enter the continent. This new theory casts doubt on the conventional one that says the earliest settlers came from Siberia, crossing the now-defunct Bering land bridge on foot and then moving through Canada when corridors opened between massive ice sheets at the end of the last ice age. A new geological study published this week in the journal Science Advances offers compelling evidence to support the new theory. A research team led by the University of Buffalo analyzed boulders and bedrock, traveling by helicopter to four remote islands within the Alexander Arc...